DON’T FRACK NEW YORK: Dangers of Hydraulic Fracturing

Josh Fox‘s new movie vividly dramatizes the dangers of Hydraulic Fracturing. The other month I saw a screening of the movie in upstate New York – at once ground central for proposed Gas and New York’s main aquifer – and it makes for grim viewing.

Hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”) is a means of natural gas extraction employed in deep natural gas well drilling. Once a well is drilled, millions of gallons of water, sand and proprietary chemicals are injected, under high pressure, into a well. The pressure fractures the shale and props open fissures that enable natural gas to flow more freely out of the well.

Horizontal hydrofracking is a means of tapping shale deposits containing natural gas that were previously inaccessible by conventional drilling. Vertical hydrofracking is used to extend the life of an existing well once its productivity starts to run out, sort of a last resort. Horizontal fracking differs in that it uses a mixture of 596 chemicals, many of them proprietary, and millions of gallons of water per frack. This water then becomes contaminated and must be cleaned and disposed of.

What is the Halliburton Loophole?

In 2005, the Bush/ Cheney Energy Bill exempted natural gas drilling from the Safe Drinking Water Act. It exempts companies from disclosing the chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing. Essentially, the provision took the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) off the job. It is now commonly referred to as the Halliburton Loophole.

What is the Safe Drinking Water Act?

In 1974, the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) was passed by Congress to ensure clean drinking water free from both natural and man-made contaminates.

What is the FRAC Act?

The FRAC Act (Fracturing Responsibility and Awareness to Chemical Act) is a House bill intended to repeal the Halliburton Loophole and to require the natural gas industry to disclose the chemicals they use.

How deep do natural gas wells go?

The average well is up to 8,000 feet deep. The depth of drinking water aquifers is about 1,000 feet. The problems typically stem from poor cement well casings that leak natural gas as well as fracking fluid into water wells.

How much water is used during the fracking process?

Generally 1-8 million gallons of water may be used to frack a well. A well may be fracked up to 18 times.

What fluids are used in the fracking process?

For each frack, 80-300 tons of chemicals may be used. Presently, the natural gas industry does not have to disclose the chemicals used, but scientists have identified volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene.

In what form does the natural gas come out of the well?

The gas comes up wet in produced water and has to be separated from the wastewater on the surface. Only 30-50% of the water is typically recovered from a well. This wastewater can be highly toxic.

What is done with the wastewater?

Evaporators evaporate off VOCs and condensate tanks steam off VOCs, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The wastewater is then trucked to water treatment facilities.

What is a well’s potential to cause air pollution?

As the VOCs are evaporated and come into contact with diesel exhaust from trucks and generators at the well site, ground level ozone is produced. Ozone plumes can travel up to 250 miles.

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Alex Bogusky Tells All (x2)

“Alex Bogusky, the Elvis of advertising,” writes FastCompany ” has left the business. Is this a New Age midlife crisis or his greatest rebranding campaign? The philosophy behind much advertising is based on the old observation that every man is really two men — the man he is and the man he wants to be. -- William Feather”
Alex gives his version of events on his blog …

Two Ad Students Make Cross-Country Pilgrimage to CPB
Meantimes, “two Miami Ad School students, Santiago Cosme and Vicor Javier Blanco, on September 3, plan to travel from New York to Boulder without spending a dime. The pair hope the kindness of strangers will feed, clothe, house and transport them to advertising nirvana.. Why? We have no idea. They aren’t even seeking a job at the agency as far as we can tell.  They’ve got a website, a Facebook page, a YouTube channel, a Twitter account and a Foursquare account. Whether or not the pair ever make it, we’ll know everything there is to know about their journey thanks to social media.”

Alex Bogusky interview in Fast company: the narcissism, the rancor, the cruelty (adland.tv)
Is Alex Bogusky a Sociopath? [Redemption Song] (gawker.com)
Alex Bogusky’s whopper advertising freakout (blogs.ft.com)
Bogusky, Creative Ad Star, Is Leaving Advertising (mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com)
For Alex Bogusky, Money is Never an Issue (adrants.com)

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Architecture & Design: Urban Outfitters Fake Block, Dutch Home from Home

Urban Outfitters, a Philadelphia-based retailer, is opening up a new store in New York City that will resemble a series of local mom-and-pop shops. The store’s facade would be split into four storefronts to look like a hat store, a hardware store, a neighborhood bar and a bodega, all reminiscent of what New York City once looked like. Ron Pompei, creative director of Pompei A.D., which designed the store says: The whole idea was to do this kind of ironic statement of lining the building with storefronts that would be reminiscent of independent businesses. It’s the story about the streets of New York as they once were.

(Pic) Dutch Hotel Is Your Temporary Home Away From Home
With the help of Dutch architects, WAM architecten, Inntel Hotels’ newly designed hotel pays homage to Zaandam’s industrial history. Situated minutes via train from Amsterdam, Zaandam, was one of the world’s premiere hotbeds for industry and an ideal place for construction as its rich history was modernized through the playful design for Inntel Hotels‘ new location. The unique structure is comprised of stacked green wooden houses popular to the Zaan region, symbolizing that the hotel is your temporary house.

Now Booking | Dutch Treat (tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com)

Bizarre Dutch hotel looks like a pile of stacked houses (dvice.com)

A pile of modest, traditional houses stretching into the sky (boingboing.net)

Retail Watch: For a new store at Broadway… (ny.curbed.com)

Stacked Houses: New Hotel in Amsterdam by WAM Dezeen (apartmenttherapy.com)

Dutch Hotel Eats Up Smaller Houses For Lunch [Architecture] (gizmodo.com)

Hotel Inntel by Wilfried van Winden (design-milk.com)

Stacked Houses Apartment Building in Tokyo Muuuz (apartmenttherapy.com)

Much of a Dutchness: the Hotel Inntel Zaandam (guardian.co.uk)

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People: Steven Grasse

Steven Grasse Does His Own Thing, or at least that’s what Piers thinks. At the recent PSFK New York Conference, (self described) “maverick creator-entrepreneur” Steven Grasse closed out the day’s discussions with a spirited talk about his journey from “disgruntled ad man to revolutionary businessman”. He spoke candidly about his inspirations, trials and tribulations, and his passion for living a life driven by art, authenticity, and conscience.

I have been an admirer of Mr Grasse’s work for some time, since seeing him and his team (from Giro as it used to be called) present credentials to my then-client Virgin Mobile. I had been particularly impressed with their Camel Lounges and work with Sailor Jerry. I later learned he invented one of my favorite drinks (Hendricks Gin). Such is the esteem in which I hold Mr Grasse I can (almost) forgive his rather strange views on English people…

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People: Piers Fawkes, James Fox, Sly Grice

David Weiner, the New York editor of Huffington Post, recently interviewed the purple one about living and working in New York City – a city he has lived for seven years. The hirsute high-brow waxed lyrical about the change effecting the creative industries they work in; public art; and my plans for the ‘Alleyway of Ideas’. Hopefully Piers’ thatch of hair will prevent his head from becoming too swollen!
Jay Lenstrom, CEO of global marketing services company The Red Peak Group, announced today the appointment of James Fox as Chief Strategic Officer. Based in New York, Fox will lead strategic planning across the company’s client roster. He reports to Lenstrom.

Sly Bailey. Trinity Mirror chief’s pay rises to £1.7m
Sly Bailey (nee Grice), the chief executive of Trinity Mirror, pocketed an overall pay packet of £1.68m in 2009 despite the company reporting a 41% slump in pre-tax profits during the year. Bailey, the highest paid director at Trinity Mirror, netted a basic salary of £736,000 and a cash bonus of £671,000 in the year. Her overall remuneration, including a £248,000 pension contribution, rose to £1.68m, compared to £1.53m the previous year.

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Digital Out Of Home: Delta and Digitas

A digital out-of-home campaign aimed at increasing awareness of Delta Airline’s flight schedule in the New York City area accomplished its task – by a measure of more than 28%. From February to mid June, the airline and its ad agency, Digitas, ran a campaign using both DOOH and traditional media. Edison Research, which surveyed consumers prior to the launch and during it, also found that business travelers’ perception of Delta’s international schedule increased by 26% and overall awareness by 15% (via Digital Sign Today).

How Delta Microtargets Business Travelers
When Delta Airlines wanted to reach business travelers just in the New York area last spring, it decided to test the idea of microtargeting with place-based media. So it teamed up with out-of-home vertical SeeSaw Networks to create multiple 15-second spots customized to a wide array of venues across five different digital out-of-home vendors.

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Operation Warrior Library

Paul Malmont is a twice published author and Copy Director at R/GA in New York. In his spare time, he and his wife have developed a program that gets books in the hands of troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, their wives stationed in far-away bases and soon will do the same for the children. Operation Warrior Library, or OWL, is the Malmonts’ way of supporting our volunteer army without paying credence to one political ideal or another. “We just want to give them a few hours of escapism,” said Malmont, who launched the program with the help of an Army Colonel. The OWL mission is clear: send reading materials across enemy lines to soldiers who would otherwise have to buy them. To accomplish that goal, the Malmonts enlisted (heh) the aid of other authors, and publishers too. To date, some 2,000 books have been donated, giving soldiers a much needed break from their daily chores.
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