Superbowl XLIII: Ads Will Suck A Bit, Link To Web

Over the years, it has been called the Ad Bowl, the Bud Bowl and the Buzz Bowl. Super Bowl XLIII on Sunday will probably go down as the Hard-Sell Bowl.As the economy soured, advertisers began crafting a hard-sell approach to their game ads, and the results will be on display Sunday. They offer a stark contrast to the slapstick of Budweiser‘s flatulent horse and Electronic Data Systems‘ Herding Cats branding ad that in past years tended to soft-peddle products and services.
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The Super Bowl advertising ranks are usually filled with the big boys of marketing: Anheuser-Busch, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo. And now: Cash4Gold?
For television viewers, the Super Bowl offers an annual midwinter spectacle. On Sunday, in addition to a football game and a halftime show, they can watch Madison Avenue try to walk a tightrope. The advertisers, which are spending up to $3 million for each 30-second commercial during Super Bowl XLIII, have a tricky task before them. They must figure out the right way to speak to consumers worried about the wretched economy while at the same time not ignore the long-standing appeal of Super Bowl Sunday as a night of escapist fare.
Determined to get their money’s worth, many of Super Sunday‘s advertisers have been using pre-game Web efforts to rev up anticipatory interest in the commercials. But the process works in the other direction, too, according to a survey conducted last week for advertising/marketing/consulting firm Hanon McKendry. Thirty percent of respondents who plan to watch the game said seeing the telecast’s commercials makes them more likely to visit an advertiser’s Web site.
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Most Social Brands of 2008

That Top 50 in full

1. iPhone
2. CNN
3. Apple
4. Disney
5. Xbox
6. Starbucks
7. iPod
8. MTV
9. Sony
10. Dell
11. Microsoft
12. Ford
13. Nintendo
14. Target
15. PlayStation
16. Mac
17. Turner
18. Hewlett-Packard
19. Fox News
20. BlackBerry
21. ABC
22. Coke
23. LG
24. Best Buy
25. Honda
26. eBay
27. Sharp
28. Lincoln
29. NBA
30. Pepsi
31. General Motors
32. McDonald’s
33. General Electric
34. Walmart
35. NFL
36. Mercedes
37. BMW
38. Samsung
39. Nike
40. Subway
41. Dodge
42. Pandora
43. CBS
44. Mercury
45. NBC
46. Disneyland
47. Last.fm
48. Toyota
49. Cadillac
50. Chevy

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Experiential: Sony Fashion Week

Sony Uses Fashion Week to Promote P-series PC
Watch out for texting mannequins later this week at Grand Central Station. In a bid to show off its stylish side in the run-up to Fashion Week, Sony wlll position well-outfitted “live mannequins” on New York streets accessorized by its sleek, colorful and tiny Vaio P-series computer. “It’s an innovative product that really deserves to go to market in an innovative way,” said Alberto Escobedo, director-brand messaging, Sony Electronics. The P-series “lifestyle notebook,” which made its debut at the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this month, is a diminutive 10 inches by 5 inches and weighs 1.4 pounds.

sony-live-mannequin

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Packaging: Wine That Loves

Wine That Loves
The Amazing Food Wine Co. owns a wine brand called Wine That Loves. This new wine brand “…takes the guesswork out of pairing wine with food. Thus, Wine That Loves Pizza, Wine That Loves Pasta, Wine That Loves Roasted Chicken, and so on.” Basically a wine marketing effort designed to make pairing wines with food easy. Serving Roasted Chicken with a Caribbean-style Mango Glaze… pair the dish with the “Wine That Loves Roasted Chicken” bottle. I particularly like the creatively straight-forward label design…

vinos

Links: UGC, Giant Robot

Can User-Generated Content Change Your World?

Every day, user-generated content (UGC) is part of the online experience of millions of US Internet users. From entertainment to communications to e-commerce, consumers are taking charge of the creation, distribution and consumption of digital content. And it’s growing. Up from 83 million in 2008, eMarketer estimates the number of UGC creators will grow to 115 million in 2013.

Few automotive brands know how to tap into the urban art scene like Scion, the hip entry-level marque by Toyota USA. Recently, Scion teamed up with Giant Robot Magazine and Japanese artist Shin Tanaka to offer the artist’s signature cut and fold paper toys in the magazine’s issues 56, 57 and soon to be released 58, which hits newsstands on 9 February, 2009. One of Tanaka’s paper robots is included in each issue. Readers who pick up all three issues can assemble the “4-in-1 Robot” commissioned by Scion.
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