Snippets

Who says you can’t buy buzz? In the end, the marketer that bought the most ad time ended up reaping the most chatter among the Twitterers, bloggers and online talkers. Pepsi-Cola dominated online conversation during the Super Bowl, according to Collective Intellect, a firm that mines and measures what people are talking about across the web. The soda brand’s ads alone accounted for 19% of the share of voice among the top 10 most-talked-about advertisers. And when you add the chatter about PepsiCo sibling brands SoBe (12% share of voice) and Doritos (7% share of voice) to the flagship product’s buzz, PepsiCo collectively accounted for 40% of all online talk.
Though top marketing execs believe that good customer experiences and positive word-of-mouth can increase loyalty and brand value, they admit that their companies are failing to properly integrate customer voice and experience into key business and marketing processes, according to a new study by the CMO Council, sponsored by Satmetrix.The study, “Giving Customer Voice More Volume,” reveals that 38% of the 480 senior marketers surveyed say their companies have no programs in place to track or propagate positive word-of-mouth among customers and only 29% say their companies rate highly in their ability handle and resolve customer problems or complaints:
As a photographer, Walker Evans made his name taking haunting portraits of America’s forgotten soulsin particular, poor sharecroppers suffering through the Depression. Less well known is that he kept an extensive postcard collection, with a particular emphasis on Americana. Those treasures, some 9,000 in all, are now the subject of an exhibition opening today at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The timing couldn’t be better, given the cards’ original purpose: projecting a confident national self-image during troubled economic times. (Well, that and providing space for tourists to tell their relatives how much they were missed.) Ambivalence pervades the collection; cozy small-town scenes are oddly devoid of people, as if the countryside had been abandoned. The shots are often juxtaposed with Evans’ own pictures, underscoring the deadpan effect.

Super Bowl Advertisers Paid More for Advertising, Got Less

Will the advertisers of Super Bowl XLIII be happy in the knowledge that they paid more for less? NBC said it sold out its entire available ad inventory on the Super Bowl last night, notching $206 million, up from $186.3 million sold by News Corp.’s Fox for the 2008 game, according to TNS Media Intelligence. But ratings were down from last year’s record-setting telecast on Fox.
Publicis Groupe, citing economic pressures, has decided to shutter its much-watched online-shopping venture Honeyshed just months after it finally got up and running. The ill-fated creative experiment was the brainchild of David Droga but was birthed through a partnership between Mr. Droga’s agency, Droga5, hotshot production house Smuggler and funding from Publicis, which published reports put at about $25 million. Its aim was to reinvent the online-shopping experience to make it more entertaining and engaging for the 18- to 35-year-old-set. Users could digitally “window shop” brands via vignettes in which attractive youngsters peddle products on channels dubbed “Fun Shit” and “Kicks to Lids” before making online purchases.

DDB, Crispin, Goodby Can’t Compete With Doritos Crotch Joke
The 288 people sequestered for USA Today’s Ad Meter panel have decided that Jeff Goodby and Alex Bogusky have nothing on a cheap crotch joke from two unemployed brothers from Indiana. Joe and Dave Herbert scored a Super Bowl spot by winning Doritos’ consumer-generated ad contest.

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