Little Chef, Corporate Websites, TwitTv, iPhones v Advertising, Sorry, Tide Thursday

You’re probably already noticing business cards containing Twitter (Twitter reviews) usernames as opposed to domain names, bands promoting their MySpace (MySpace reviews) profile instead of their own website, and even ad campaigns directing people to participate in a social media rather than visit a branded website. The latter is exactly what Vitamin Water is doing through a multi-channel campaign featuring NBA superstars LeBron James and Kobe Bryant.
What’s Twitter doing? Going after a TV series. The San Francisco-based web phenom has partnered with Reveille and Brillstein Entertainment to develop an unscripted TV skein described as “putting ordinary people on the trail of celebrities in a revolutionary competitive format.”
According to a recent survey, iPhone users are more likely to recall mobile ads than non-iPhone users. US Mobile Phone Users and iPhone Users Who Recall Viewing Mobile Advertising, by Type, Q1 2009 (% of respondents in each group) iPhone users had higher rates of recall from all measured types of mobile ads than nonusers, including mobile display, standard text message (SMS), audio, picture or video messages (MMS) and mobile TV and video ads.
There’s one word consumers haven’t heard much that might serve these companies better than their current dirges: sorry. That thought came to mind as a rash of “We’re sorry” ads broke out recently across the pond in the U.K. an underwear manufacturer apologizing . Marks & Spencer recently ran a national campaign apologizing for for charging bigger-breasted women more for bigger bras. The headline, of course: “We boobed.”
When P&G Chairman-CEO A.G. Lafley appears at one this week, some believe the near-term future of packaged-goods marketing — and the long-term future of Procter & Gamble — may hang in the balance. Some are even billing the appearance as “Tide Thursday,” a reference to “Marlboro Friday” in 1993, when Philip Morris, battered by value-brand incursions on its Marlboro brand, cut prices 20% and stepped up consumer marketing in a move that was ultimately copied by many in the consumer-goods industry, reshaping the way many marketers approached pricing and advertising.


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