Beer Turnstile lets partygoers travel home free on Metro

Carnival in Rio is exuberant and outrageous. With two million people attending each day, Rio becomes a place where anything goes and alcohol flows. Drink-driving incidents increase by 50% during the period.

Carnival in Rio is exuberant and outrageous. With two million people attending each day, Rio becomes a place where anything goes and alcohol flows. Drink-driving incidents increase by 50% during the period.   To live up to their ‘Don’t Drink and Drive’ effort, Antarctica Beer decided to help carnivalgoers get home safely after drinking. To do this they created the ‘Beer Turnstile’ at metro stations which accepted (presumably empty) Antarctica beer cans as tickets.   All passengers had to do was scan the bar code on the beer can, and the turnstile unlocked. All the beer cans collected were then donated for recycling.  This effective campaign took advantage of a potentially dangerous behavior, and leveraged innovative technology to provide brand utility and promote safety.   The Beer Turnstile received an average of a thousand passengers an hour and the number of drunk drivers caught went down by 43%.

To live up to their ‘Don’t Drink and Drive’ effort, Antarctica Beer decided to help carnivalgoers get home safely after drinking. To do this they created the ‘Beer Turnstile’ at metro stations which accepted (presumably empty) Antarctica beer cans as tickets.

All passengers had to do was scan the bar code on the beer can, and the turnstile unlocked. All the beer cans collected were then donated for recycling.

This effective campaign took advantage of a potentially dangerous behavior, and leveraged innovative technology to provide brand utility and promote safety.

The Beer Turnstile received an average of a thousand passengers an hour and the number of drunk drivers caught went down by 43%.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL

With the advent of always-on, ubiquitous internet access, and digitization, our actual and virtual lives are increasingly starting to blend into one.

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The Future of Communications

<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies/savannah-2020-conference&#8221; title=”The Future of Communications” target=”_blank”>The Future of Communications</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies&#8221; target=”_blank”>Savannah Strategies</a></strong> </div>

Howard Schultz: “Onward”

So Howard’s people sent me a review copy of his book today. One assumes that reaching out to marketing bloggers was part of the launch strategy (I’m all in favor of that!) I was also interested to see copies of his book floating around Starbucks outlets (hey, if you have a massive retail footprint, why not use it?)

I confess I have not yet read the book but please check back for some deathless prose on the subject!

Here’s the blurb:

ONWARD
How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul
by Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks
March 29, 2011, Rodale

In 2008, Howard Schultz made the unprecedented decision to return as the CEO eight years after he stepped down from daily oversight of the company and became chairman. Concerned that the Starbucks experience had been compromised by its quest for growth, Schultz was determined to help it return to its core values and restore its financial health. In ONWARD, he shares the remarkable story of his return and the company’s ongoing transformation under his leadership, revealing how, during one of the most tumultuous economic times in history, Starbucks again achieved profitability and sustain­ability.

Schultz not only had to act fast and aggressively on a global scale, but had to look in the mirror, confront the company’s blemishes and search for answers to such hard questions as:

·    How can you evolve your brand—especially an iconic one—to be relevant to a new age while being true to its roots?
·    How can you grow a company without losing an intimate relationship with each customer
·    How can you revive your employees’ passion for your company’s founding principles?

There was no easy roadmap and plenty of risks. From a leaked memo that exposed Starbucks’ troubles to the world, to the costly decision to close all Starbucks stores for a day of retraining, to introducing an aggressive pipeline of new innovations to land the next blockbuster offering, ONWARD takes readers through the tough decisions and painful steps of a turnaround that should inspire anyone to reinvent themselves and triumph against the odds.

Well alright then! Sounds like a page-turner. In general I am an admirer of Starbucks marketing, so I think I will make a valiant attempt to read it.

To show what a stand-up guy I am, and as a thanks to Howie for the book, here’s a link to buy it on Amazon.

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A Load of Crap: Charmin’s Go Nation

A Load of Crap: Charmin’s Go Nation
“Never mind that those ads featuring bears that can’t wipe properly are odd enough. Charmin now is on a mission to start a movement, we’re sure pun is intended, in which the entire nation can enjoy a “better bathroom experience.”

“We’re calling it the Charmin Go Nation,” it says on the website “… it’s made up of people who actually enjoy going to the bathroom because they have Charmin bathroom tissue.”

Sounds like the client wrote it. Utterly Ridiculous.

While we’re at it – shout out to the guys at Kleercut for telling it like it is.

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Mad Men shill for Unilever

Unilever Launches ‘Mad Men’ Blitz
Says a spokesman” “Unilever created the vignettes to showcase its iconic brands and celebrate their heritage on a hit show that is culturally relevant to consumers today. Consumers are craving nostalgia. The featured brands are prominent today and were popular in the 1960s, when ‘Mad Men’ is set.” Interestingly, the first reactions from viewers and bloggers haven’t been positive, with complaints about how the ads too closely mimic the show. On the “Mad Men” Facebook page: “Who is Dove soap trying to fool with that fake Mad Men commercial!? That is how I felt, like Dove was trying to steal Mad Men’s thunder!’.

And there’s more: “Despite hating the weak, we-suckered-you-into-watching-our commercial, Dove did generate some talk about … Still, subconsciously, I’m sure next time I buy soap I will see the Dove brand and automatically think SCAM ARTISTS and buy Ivory instead.” A blogger griped, “I usually love Dove commercials but I found this one to be way off-target from their ‘women loving themselves’ branding.

    Dove ‘Mad Men’ Commercial Causes Controversy; Unilever Says It’s Witty Parody (stylelist.com)
    Dove make ads just for Mad Men, women have the ideas, get no credit (adland.tv)
    More Fake ‘Mad Men’; More Real Ads (mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com)
    Advertising: Commercials in ‘Mad Men’ Style, Created for the Series (nytimes.com)

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    Beverage: Glen Rossie Rossi, Fucking Hell Beer, Coca Colla

    “Glen Rossie has a tremendous whisky heritage and as we approach its 200th anniversary in 2014 we want to turn it into a global brand,” said David Birchall, chief executive of The Brand Cellar. Rossi signed up to become the face of the brand earlier this year, with Birchall claiming the rock legend can improve Glen Rossie’s success in overseas markets: “As ‘front man’ for the Glen Rossie brand, we believe he can help us reinvigorate sales not just in the UK but, as someone who has sold 118m records worldwide, overseas too.”

    German Execs Win Rights to Best Beer Name Ever
    An Upper Austrian village called Fucking, is the inspiration for a new beer called Fucking Hell. Yes, the common English term for surprise and/or frustration is now a brand name thanks to a German firm which has been granted permission by the European Union’s Trade Marks and Designs Registration Office to brew beer and produce clothing under the name.

    A certain US soft drinks giant may disagree, but Bolivia has come up with a fizzy beverage it says is the real thing: Coca Colla. The drink, made from the coca leaf and named after the indigenous Colla people from Bolivia’s highlands, went on sale this week across the South American country. It is black, sweet and comes in a bottle with a red label – but similarities to Coca-Cola end there. One is a symbol of US-led globalisation and corporate might; the other could be considered a socialist-tinged affront to western imperialism. The first batch of 12,000 bottles, priced about $1.50 (96p) for half a litre, were distributed in the capital, La Paz, as well as Santa Cruz and Cochabamba. The familiar-sounding name and packaging may rile the Atlanta-based soft drinks manufacturer, but Coca Colla could also cause groans in Washington.
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    Brand Collaborations: Coke/ Emeco, Special K/ M&S

    On the eve of the world’s biggest furniture fair, two classic brands — Coca Cola and Emeco, manufacturers of the iconic 106 aluminum Navy chair — are announcing the rainbow-hued progeny of their new collaboration. Each new Emeco 111 Navy Chair is made of 111 recycled plastic bottles. Over the course of a year, Emeco estimates it will process more than three million PET bottles to produce the product, which will be sold for $230 at Design Within Reach. Designed in 1944 for the U.S. Navy, the original Emeco chair takes 77 steps to produce and includes a process that alters the aluminum’s molecular structure so that it’s three times harder than steel. The new chair won’t be quite so tough, but will provide a way for PET to be up-cyed. Each chair will contain a mix of 60% PET and a combination of other materials, including pigment and glass fiber for strength.

    Special K to sell red dress through M&S deal
    Kellogg is to make a red dress shown in TV ads for its Special K cereal available for the public to buy for the first time. It has signed a deal with Marks & Spencer, which will sell the garment online and in participating stores from next month, priced £19.50. The three-in-one beach dress, which is also available in four other colours, can be worn as a halter-neck or strapless dress, or as a skirt.

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