Beer Turnstile lets partygoers travel home free on Metro

Carnival in Rio is exuberant and outrageous. With two million people attending each day, Rio becomes a place where anything goes and alcohol flows. Drink-driving incidents increase by 50% during the period.

Carnival in Rio is exuberant and outrageous. With two million people attending each day, Rio becomes a place where anything goes and alcohol flows. Drink-driving incidents increase by 50% during the period.   To live up to their ‘Don’t Drink and Drive’ effort, Antarctica Beer decided to help carnivalgoers get home safely after drinking. To do this they created the ‘Beer Turnstile’ at metro stations which accepted (presumably empty) Antarctica beer cans as tickets.   All passengers had to do was scan the bar code on the beer can, and the turnstile unlocked. All the beer cans collected were then donated for recycling.  This effective campaign took advantage of a potentially dangerous behavior, and leveraged innovative technology to provide brand utility and promote safety.   The Beer Turnstile received an average of a thousand passengers an hour and the number of drunk drivers caught went down by 43%.

To live up to their ‘Don’t Drink and Drive’ effort, Antarctica Beer decided to help carnivalgoers get home safely after drinking. To do this they created the ‘Beer Turnstile’ at metro stations which accepted (presumably empty) Antarctica beer cans as tickets.

All passengers had to do was scan the bar code on the beer can, and the turnstile unlocked. All the beer cans collected were then donated for recycling.

This effective campaign took advantage of a potentially dangerous behavior, and leveraged innovative technology to provide brand utility and promote safety.

The Beer Turnstile received an average of a thousand passengers an hour and the number of drunk drivers caught went down by 43%.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL

With the advent of always-on, ubiquitous internet access, and digitization, our actual and virtual lives are increasingly starting to blend into one.

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The Future of Communications

<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies/savannah-2020-conference&#8221; title=”The Future of Communications” target=”_blank”>The Future of Communications</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies&#8221; target=”_blank”>Savannah Strategies</a></strong> </div>

Sir Martin vs Enfatico

I took no pleasure in the news that Enfatico “failed”. (Enfatico, for some reason attracted a slew of detractors). I am not even sure of the status of the company (“folded in” … but how?) The website is still up, but the last blog entry is June 9th. I am a firm believer in a holistic approach to marketing, and I think that Enfatico was more a victim of circumstance than of hubris. Sir Martin has his own take on matters…
enfatico
During an interview with Forbes India, WPP‘s Martin Sorrell was asked a number of questions about Enfatico and why it didn’t work. His responses were pretty finger-pointy, especially when he was asked about the one-off agency’s demise:
Q: Why didn’t Enfatico work then?
Sorrell: Because it’s an extremely difficult thing to do. And the two prime movers behind it left Dell.
The two prime movers are of course former Dell CMO Mark Jarvis and Casey Jones, Dell’s vp of global marketing.
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Ambient: Economist Pizza

Economist-branded pizza boxes
The Economist did something interesting in Philadelphia, USA recently. They branded pizza boxes that went out from 20 pizzerias in the city with global statistics of food consumption – like the amount of wheat consumption or cheese imports. Apparently, most of the pizzerias were near universities or colleges, so they had the aim of getting young people interested in the magazine. I hope the disproportionate buzz outweighed the wastage …

economist-pizza

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Snippets: Cheap Cigs, Web 2.d’Oh, Robotgalaxy, How ’bout dem Apple Apples?

Financial Crisis Spurs Smoking Increase and Switch to Cheaper Brands
More than three-quarters (77%) of current smokers in the US report that they have increased stress levels because of the economic crisis, and two-thirds of those smokers say this stress has had an effect on their smoking behavior, according to a survey from the American Legacy Foundation, conducted by Harris Interactive. The data indicates that stress over the economy is causing some smokers to delay attempts to quit, increase the number of cigarettes they are smoking, and/or switch to a less-expensive brand instead of quitting. In addition, the survey found that seven percent of stressed-out smokers who had quit are now smoking again, while nine percent of former smokers said the financial situation had tempted them to start smoking again.

cheap-cigs

Sprint’s out with a new site to promote their mobile broadband product. They attempt to show users how awesome the web is by doing their best to shoehorn every time-sucking thing on the web into one page.
sprint
Brothers who have endured endless hours waiting while their sisters shop happily at the American Girl Store will soon have their revenge: with the launch of ROBOTGALAXY’s personalized robots, boys will also get to engage in the interactive shopping experience.
robotgalaxy
A Japanese super-fan has grown Apple-branded Fuji apples by adhering stickers to the still-ripening fruits a month before picking. Apple has yet to comment about the unofficially-logo’d Fuji’s, but we doubt they will. That is, unless they don’t taste good. (Or constantly crash.)
apple-apples
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Social Media: Digital Drag Race

Digital Designers Face Off in Intel’s Digital Drag Race
Intel has decided to dip its toes into social media, with Digital Drag Race, a competition which pits professional digital designers against one another mixed with a consumer-generated aspect for non-professionals. The campaign was created at Razorfish San Francisco, by Creative Directors Adam Connelly and Kate McCagg.

digital-drag-race

Launching November 17 a collection of professional designers will spend 70 minutes on a computer powered by the brand new Intel Core i7 Extreme Edition Processor using Abobe Creative Suite 4 to create a 17 second motion graphic using supplied assets; video, music, vector images. The content of the videos are to center on the themes of power, speed and innovation.

adam-connelly

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