2013 Trends – Consumer :: Media :: Technology

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The Future of Communications

<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies/savannah-2020-conference&#8221; title=”The Future of Communications” target=”_blank”>The Future of Communications</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies&#8221; target=”_blank”>Savannah Strategies</a></strong> </div>

Howard Schultz: “Onward”

So Howard’s people sent me a review copy of his book today. One assumes that reaching out to marketing bloggers was part of the launch strategy (I’m all in favor of that!) I was also interested to see copies of his book floating around Starbucks outlets (hey, if you have a massive retail footprint, why not use it?)

I confess I have not yet read the book but please check back for some deathless prose on the subject!

Here’s the blurb:

ONWARD
How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul
by Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks
March 29, 2011, Rodale

In 2008, Howard Schultz made the unprecedented decision to return as the CEO eight years after he stepped down from daily oversight of the company and became chairman. Concerned that the Starbucks experience had been compromised by its quest for growth, Schultz was determined to help it return to its core values and restore its financial health. In ONWARD, he shares the remarkable story of his return and the company’s ongoing transformation under his leadership, revealing how, during one of the most tumultuous economic times in history, Starbucks again achieved profitability and sustain­ability.

Schultz not only had to act fast and aggressively on a global scale, but had to look in the mirror, confront the company’s blemishes and search for answers to such hard questions as:

·    How can you evolve your brand—especially an iconic one—to be relevant to a new age while being true to its roots?
·    How can you grow a company without losing an intimate relationship with each customer
·    How can you revive your employees’ passion for your company’s founding principles?

There was no easy roadmap and plenty of risks. From a leaked memo that exposed Starbucks’ troubles to the world, to the costly decision to close all Starbucks stores for a day of retraining, to introducing an aggressive pipeline of new innovations to land the next blockbuster offering, ONWARD takes readers through the tough decisions and painful steps of a turnaround that should inspire anyone to reinvent themselves and triumph against the odds.

Well alright then! Sounds like a page-turner. In general I am an admirer of Starbucks marketing, so I think I will make a valiant attempt to read it.

To show what a stand-up guy I am, and as a thanks to Howie for the book, here’s a link to buy it on Amazon.

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Beverage: Coke vs “The Road”, RangTang vs Urban Dictionary

    an interesting addition to the Coke Happiness advertising collection. During the filming of the Viggo Mortensen movie The Road (opened quietly last year in the U.S. and then big in the UK), we are told the actors and crew took a a break during filming to create this Coke Happiness commercial. It’s entirely believable too. After all, Coke is just bottled chemicals. There’s no reason it wouldn’t taste “good” even after years inside an old, decrepit vending machine.

    RangTang Vodka Tainted by Slang Definition
    So a new orange- and tangerine-flavored extension from Proximo’s Three Olives brand — which already offers a “citrus” and an “orange” — faced a tough task in trying to find a name that could differentiate it in an overcrowded market. They came up with “RangTang,” described as “a delicious blend of imported English vodka and the bold taste of outrageously juicy oranges and tangerines.” And that sounds tasty enough, if you can get past the “English vodka” bit. The problem for Proximo — which also markets 1800 Tequila — is that RangTang has another, less appealing definition, according to Urban Dictionary (see second, original definition). One so awful, we can’t even think about typing it on this site.

      Viggo Mortensen Will Take David Cronenberg’s ‘Talking Cure’ (cinematical.com)
      Day 42 Drink: Three Olives Rangtang Vodka (lyke2drink.blogspot.com)

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      Digital Out Of Home: Delta and Digitas

      A digital out-of-home campaign aimed at increasing awareness of Delta Airline’s flight schedule in the New York City area accomplished its task – by a measure of more than 28%. From February to mid June, the airline and its ad agency, Digitas, ran a campaign using both DOOH and traditional media. Edison Research, which surveyed consumers prior to the launch and during it, also found that business travelers’ perception of Delta’s international schedule increased by 26% and overall awareness by 15% (via Digital Sign Today).

      How Delta Microtargets Business Travelers
      When Delta Airlines wanted to reach business travelers just in the New York area last spring, it decided to test the idea of microtargeting with place-based media. So it teamed up with out-of-home vertical SeeSaw Networks to create multiple 15-second spots customized to a wide array of venues across five different digital out-of-home vendors.

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      New Rules: Apple, Luxury

      If thinking about altering a wildly successful business sounds a bit contrary to you, in “We Should All Get It Wrong Like Apple,” Jonathan Weber points out that Apple does none of the things that pundits always say you should do to succeed in the Internet economy. No blogging, tweeting, Facebooking, free samples, asking for feedback or engaging with the customer base for the sages from Cupertino. Why, they even do a heck of a lot of advertising in the dead-tree mediums, as well as broadcast TV and billboards. What lessons are to be learned? 1. It’s all about good product. 2. Brand marketing still matters. 3. Real-time engagement with customers is not a required course of action.
      Instead of the marketing status quo, Bastien we has proposed the “anti-laws of marketing”: 18 axioms that include: raise your prices to increase demand; advertising does not aim at selling; and – most importantly – do not pander to consumers’ wishes.
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      Bogusky: Baked In v Half Baked

      Joe Ciarallo recently interviewed David Steel, SVP of marketing at Samsung, about merging communications and product development. This practice (or theory) is also the subject of Alex Bogusky and John Winsor’s “Baked In: Creating Products and Businesses That Market Themselves”.
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      The LA Times missed the point a bit … asserting that the  “Ad guys’ new book is self-glorifying and half-baked”. AdFreak weren’t keen either.
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      For my money, it gets to the heart of one of the simple things many agencies ignore.  The worlds of product development and marketing should not be artificially separated.  You can create a much more powerful business and brand when you bake marketing directly in to the product. This has created things like Nike+ and Help Remedies and has revitalized brands like Domino’s to name but a few.
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      You can buy the book here and read the mandatory Twitter feed here.
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