2013 Trends – Consumer :: Media :: Technology

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The Fascinating World of Digital Coupons

A study conducted by Harris Interactive found adults with children at home are more likely to be interested in text alerts about sales and promotions than those with no kids at home. Of people with kids younger than 6 in their household, 35% are at least somewhat interested in getting opt-in text alerts from favorite businesses, compared to 32% of households with older kids and 25% of homes with no children. (The study, conducted in May with 2,000 adults, does not distinguish between childless adults and empty-nesters.)
The Growing Market for Mobile Coupons
According to this compelling infographic, mobile coupons appear to be what is driving the mobile advertising market’s growth – and are the most motivating to consumers. Mobile coupons were a $90 million market in the U.S. in 2009, but are expected to grow to $6.5 billion in 4 years. Particularly convincing is that coupons and purchase incentives drive people to spend far more than they would have without said coupon – on average, from $122 without a coupon to $216 with.
    Kroger Co., looking to boost traffic and use of its loyalty program, is making it easier to download digital coupons and load them onto its loyalty cards. The grocery chain is offering more than 100 coupons on its website and allowing users to digitally “clip” them and load them onto their Kroger Plus loyalty cards – the first time Kroger has put together a digital clearinghouse in this way. At checkout, shoppers scan their Plus Card and the discounts are automatically deducted from their bill, the company explains. The Digital Coupon Center includes coupons for Kroger private label brands as well as for popular brands.
    Simon Property Group has teamed up with a Silicon startup, Shopkick, to give its retailers a new option with digital couponing: an application that beams offers to shoppers as they walk by the stores. Simon Property Group is one of the largest retail real estate owners in the country, with some 370 shopping centers. It will be launching this program in 25 of its stores in New York, Chicago, southern California and San Francisco, with plans to introduce it in 100 centers over the next several months. (via the AP). This is how the application works: retailers install the Shopkick application on small speakers at the entrance to their stores. These emit an inaudible sound – which contains a code for the store – that is picked up by cellphones’ microphones. Consumers need to have the Shopkick app on their phones to receive any offers.

    Kroger Takes Online Coupons to Next Level (adweek.com)
    Kroger Launches Online Coupon Center (webpronews.com)
    Shopkick Prepares to Kick Off a Geo-Retailing Revolution (dailyfinance.com)
    Best Buy Launches Shopkick Automatic Checkins and Rewards at 257 Stores (mashable.com)
    Mall deal gives big boost to cell-phone coupons (sfgate.com)
    shopkick and Simon Property Group to Bring Location-Based Shopping App to More Than 100 of the Nation’s Largest Malls (prnewswire.com)

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    POS: Mobile, Cameras

    The new POS: Mobile
    It’s the ad served while you are reading the news in the morning on an e-reader that knows you’re at home and three blocks from a Starbucks. It’s a loyalty program on your phone that, through a hotel-room sensor, sets the lights and thermostat and turns the TV to CNN when you walk in the door. It’s finding a restaurant in a strange city on a Tuesday night, discovering that a store nearby stocks the TV you’re looking for, or that a certain grocery on the way home has the cut of meat you need.  Forget Foursquare or Gowalla: Soon every website and service will be able to tell where you are, opening up the floodgates for location-based marketing and blurring the budget lines for advertisers. “What used to be called point-of-purchase is now called mobile advertising,” said Kip Cassino, VP-research at Borrell Associates. “Mobile can be an extension of a retailer’s storefront.”
    There is a growing number stores deploying video cameras, motion detectors and other sensors – some hidden, some overt – but all doing more than merely monitoring aisles for shoppers. Increasingly, whether customers realize it or not, and often they don’t, this technology is being used to study consumers for behavior, shopping and product preferences and other insights that will lead to more marketing opportunities and increase sales, according to the New York Times.
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    Mobile: VW 2010 GTI

    VW 2010 GTI
    AKQA San Francisco did a good (if predictable) job avoiding TV spots for the 2010 GTI launch. You have to admire any digital agency that could pull this off – I couldn’t imagine many of the others doing it – even AKQA’s other offices.

    They need to buff up their rationale for using the iPhone though – it comes across as tactic first (an iPhone app!) and post-rationalized strategy after. I wonder if the channel choice was a client mandate (in a Volvo S-60ish way) or an agency initiative? They also talk about “80% increases” in enquiries without showing a comparison, which makes it meaningless.

    The app/ game itself was made by Aus-based Firemint.

    Blah blah blah. All in all a good effort though, but more strategy please.

    It’s clever of AKQA to  promote the campaign within FB itself and encourage people to fan their brand through the video clip

    Volkswagen ‘launches’ the 2010 GTI on the iPhone with Real Racing GTI game (mobilecrunch.com)
    Volkswagen Launches New Car Through iPhone Game [IPhone] (kotaku.com)
    Volkswagen Becomes First Auto Manufacturer To Launch a Car Exclusively on a Mobile Device (slumpedoverkeyboarddead.com)
    VW 2010 GTI – mobile car launch through the itunes App store (nickburcher.com)
    Blue Plate Special: Real Racing GTI For iPhone/Touch (geardiary.com)
    Volkswagen launches free version of Real Racing to promote 2010 GTI (tuaw.com)
    New VW GTI Launched With iPhone App, Mazda Diesels Could Come To U.S.: Today’s Car News (blogs.thecarconnection.com)

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    Mobile: Touchscreen, TwitterPeek, eReaders

    The number of touchscreen mobile-phone users in the US has grown 159% during the past year – to 23.8 million in August 2009 – and has substantially outpaced the already-strong 63% growth of smartphone use, according to a study of touchscreen mobile phone adoption in the US by comScore, Inc.
    iphone 159% growth
    A new gadget designed specifically for people who want to tweet on the go was launched Tuesday by gadget maker Peek. The device, dubbed TwitterPeek, does one thing and one thing only: it lets people tweet. It doesn’t access e-mail. It doesn’t make phone calls. It tweets. That’s it. TwitterPeek, which looks like a smartphone, features a QWERTY keyboard and comes in black or aqua blue. The idea behind TwitterPeek is simple. After buying the device, users need only to input their Twitter credentials to get going. The gadget lets them tweet, reply, retweet, send direct messages, and download followers. It supports one account at a time. Users can also view TwitPics by clicking the “view content” option from the TwitterPeek menu. The company claims its battery lasts three to four days with average usage.
    twitterpeek
    In what appears to be indicative of Twitter’s success and growing popularity, a new gadget has hit the market that has been developed specifically – and solely – for users to send and receive tweets. TwitterPeek, a $99.95 device with a QWERTY keyboard, color screen and click-scroll wheel offered through Amazon.com, could prove to be the hot selling item for the holiday season. On one hand, it’s less expensive than a smartphone upgrade. On the other, it could also prove dud-worthy if demand never materializes.
    .
    With the iPhone still the hottest smartphone, there’s much speculation about how its future will pan out. For some the money’s on gaming, but new research from Flurry is surprisingly different: eBook apps are overtaking games in the App Store.
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