Experiential: The National Pop Up

The National pops up …
In-demand indie band the National helped build buzz for the release of their fifth album, High Violet, by taking a page from the pop-up retail playbook (WSJ.com 5.8.10). For five nights starting the day of their new album’s release, the Brooklyn band and various artsy pals took over a previously vacant storefront on East Fourth Street, redubbing it the High Violet Annex. The 150-person capacity space was transformed into a free-flowing event featuring rotating live music performances, art exhibits and movie screenings. Details of just what was going down in the space on any given night were purposely kept scarce to maximize the need-to-be-there factor and build up word-of-mouth buzz.

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Overcoming Creative Blocks, Keeping Innovation Alive

Scott Hansen has compiled a great list of tips and ideas to break out of the dreaded creative blocks we all encounter at one time or another. 25 different creative professionals all give their take on how to get back into the groove when faced with creative obstructions.

How to Kill Innovation: Keep Asking Questions
Sharing his thoughts in the Harvard Business Review, author Scott Anthony believes that content questioning is the real enemy of innovation. Anthony says that “What About…” questions – the ones which endlessly ponder every possible scenario and variable surrounding an idea or plan are what stops real innovation in its tracks.

And what’s the solution? Action.

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Future Children, The World According Today’s 9 Year Olds

Future-thinker Shane Hope explores the cultural and technological norms of the distant future, expressing them through the fictional schoolwork diaries of children in the era of “memochems, divvies, and exocortical existence.” His work with Compile-A-Child exists at the intersection of science fiction and imaginative childhood innocence, built on extensions and iterations of emerging themes in transhumanistic cognitive science.

(Video) The World According To 9 Year Olds
Questions include: identifying the most famous celebrities, their first computer interactions, and their fears. If nothing else, it will make you feel a bit older than you currently are.

The decade according to 9-year-olds from allison louie-garcia on Vimeo.

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Recession: Unbranded Couch-Potatoism …

Consumers are defecting from iconic CPG brands as they try to save money by purchasing less-expensive store and private-label brands. While this trend is not new, it has become more pervasive since the economic downturn started in December 2007, per eMarketer. In fact, 59 percent of U.S. consumers reported having switched to store brand food and household products over the past six months, according to a May 2009 study by ICOM.


Recession Intensifies ‘Couch Potatoism’ as TV, Internet Converge
Some 26% more Americans chose TV as their favorite type of media than they did last year, according to a new study by Deloitte, which lends credence to the theory that the recession has intensified America’s love for television. The study revealed that more than 70% of respondents ranked TV among their top-three favorite media activities; 34% placed it at the top of the list. TV also snared more than double the numbers of the second most popular media choice, the internet, which came in at 14%, according to MediaBuyerPlanner.

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Viral: Longevity, Awards

# This kind of viral activity is only possible when there is repeat viewing. That means there’s something about these videos that make people want to watch again and again.
# They have a sense whimsy. “All of these are ‘feel good’ spots that are fun and don’t take themselves too seriously,”. They provide an escape.
# They all contain the bit of “how’d they do that?” and “is it real?” that many successful viral videos seem to employ.
# And finally, he notes, “Most of these have a deep musical connection, which definitely contributes positive associations. Just look at Apple’s iPod ads for this.”


Virals Recognized With Their Own Festival.
No longer relegated to living on YouTube, virals have become mainstream and need their due. So goes the thinking behind the second annual Viral Film Festival. The brainchild of French buzz agency Vanksen, the competition seeks to recognize the impact that virals have had in pop culture by giving them a home. The awards will cover the most outrageous clips in eight different categories, including user-generated, music and non-profit.

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Zac Posen: From Duds To Domiciles

Page 6: “Zac Posen is moving on from duds to domiciles. Sources said the fashion designer is teaming with architect Morris Adjmi to create a luxury boutique residence just south of the Flatiron District. Posen, who also has a furniture line coming out next year, will be in charge of creating the fixtures, trims, and furnishings of the units, which will go on sale in December.”
zac posen
Zac Posen and 16 West 21st Street
Earlier today Page Six reported that fashion designer Zac Posen is “teaming with architect Morris Adjmi to create a luxury boutique residence just south of the Flatiron District.” According to a press release announcing the collaboration, “[Adjmi’s] ‘whiter than white’ pure glass design for 16 West 21st Street provides a stately yet minimalistic canvas, affording Posen the opportunity to create an environmental tapestry that evokes the rich colors and textures that are emblematic of his approach to fashion.” Not quite what we’d call concrete specifics, but this is not just a name licensing thing. We’re told Posen really is going to be putting his stamp on the building’s guts, including getting into the nitty-gritty on everything from cabinetry and hardwood inside the units to shared spaces like the lobby and hallways. Should make for an interesting sales pitch come December. There are 11 units, including a garden duplex and triplex penthouse.
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