Tiger Woods vs Sponsorship

Accenture ends Tiger Woods sponsorship deal
The giant management consultancy firm Accenture has ended its sponsorship of Tiger Woods, saying the golfer is “no longer the right representative”. Woods has been engulfed in a media storm since a disturbance outside his house two weeks ago. He has since admitted being unfaithful to his wife.


Tiger Woods sponsors AT&T, Gillette limit tarnished golfer’s role in campaigns amid sex scandal
Tiger Woods is facing an ugly split after a long and happy relationship – with his sponsors. Corporate giants AT&T and Gillette distanced themselves Saturday from the world’s best-known golfer/philanderer, raising questions about Woods’ multimillion-dollar advertising appeal. Gillette announced it will cut back on Woods’ marketing role as the golfer focuses on his home life.

The Tiger Woods tumult continues as Swiss watchmaker Tag Heuer is now apparently cooling its relationship with the beleagured golfer. According to reports, Tag Heuer nixed their line of ads featuring Woods sporting their “Link” watch line. Adding insult to injury, the brand has not only removed in-store ads featuring Woods from stores Down Under but it’s canceled plans for the golfer to help design a line of upscale titanium “Professional Golf” watches.
Tiger Woods has lost his spot as the face of consultancy Accenture and has been at least temporarily pulled from Gillette ads following the golfer’s tabloid turn. Nike, PepsiCo and AT&T have indicated they would wait for Woods resumes his golf career before considering their association with the star. For Accenture, the situation points to the perils of adopting a marketing strategy so bound up with the fortunes of a single celebrity spokesman.
Here’s a look at how Tiger Woods’ top current sponsors are reacting to the golfer’s indefinite break from the sport, a move his spokesmen said he made so he can fix his marriage:

Tag Heuer stands by Tiger Woods (guardian.co.uk)

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Techno Deathmatch: iTablet vKindle, Pixi v iPhone

The hype around the iTablet is reaching a fever pitch with the Kindle increasingly looking like yet another example of Apple roadkill. If Apple can consume 32% of the profits in the mobile phone biz in less than three years, it should be no problem to swallow the nascent e-reader business in one quick bite. No sooner had Jeff Bezos graced the cover of Fast Company than the Kindle was pronounced dead by the digiterati (actually, it was “Kindle in Danger of Becoming E-books’ Betamax,” according to Brett Arends in the Wall Street Journal). With competition for e-readers heating up, will Jeff be able to defend his walled garden from rivals inside and outside the category that he built?
itablet

Palm Pixi v iPhone
Palm‘s Pre was heralded as a potential iPhone-killer well ahead of its launch, but in the end it didn’t quite deliver. Its performance was slightly ahead of the iPhone 3G, but lagged behind Apple’s revamped iPhone 3GS (aided in part by Apple’s enhanced iPhone firmware which works on all its smartphones). Then we heard rumors that Palm was working on another webOS phone, but it had possibly been delayed due to poor Pre sales. That phone was codenamed Eos and Pixie, and it’s turned out to be the new Palm Pixi–a candybar phone with much simpler design than the Pre. So much simpler, in fact, that it’s probably fairer to compare the Pixi’s performance to the older iPhone 3G–which is still on sale, and is Pixi’s closest competitor. Pixi’s less capable than the Pre, and priced more cheaply, and it makes even more sense.

Report: Steve Jobs concentrating on tablet (news.cnet.com)

Steve Jobs is Hard at Work on Apple Tablet (shoppingblog.com)

Analyst: iPhone secure against competitors, AT&T not so much (venturebeat.com)

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iPhone: The Hummer of cellphones

iPhones Overload AT&T’s Network, Angering Customers
“Slim and sleek as it is, the iPhone is really the Hummer of cellphones. It’s a data guzzler. Owners use them like minicomputers, which they are, and use them a lot. Not only do iPhone owners download applications, stream music and videos and browse the Web at higher rates than the average smartphone user, but the average iPhone owner can also use 10 times the network capacity used by the average smartphone user. “They don’t even realize how much data they’re using,” said Gene Munster, a senior securities analyst with Piper Jaffray. The result is dropped calls, spotty service, delayed text and voice messages and glacial download speeds as AT&T’s cellular network strains to meet the demand. Another result is outraged customers.”

erics huge iphone

Photo: Eric’s iPhone

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