That’s So Obama, Twitter Brands, Duffel Coat, PI&C, Starbucks v Oprah, Obama v Atari, Shiner, Audi

New Slang
Each year ushers in a bevy of new words you might hear and may even want to use (though you may choose to do so sparingly). 2009 ushers in a vocabulary inspired by pop culture and technology, and here are a few of the favorites heard from the streets, our bloggers, and Gen Ys who know…

My top vote?

Obama/Not Obama
adj. London street reporters proclaim that our new President has become synonymous with “cool”
“Yeah, that is so Obama!”

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40 of the Best Twitter Brands and the People Behind Them
Mashable highlights the 40 best brand accounts on Twitter — including Ford, Jet Blue, Hertz and Home Depot — and the people behind them. Well, behind 38 of them. The only two identities Mashable doesn’t get to the bottom of are of the people behind the Burger King and Popeyes Chicken accounts. That is, if the Popeyes Twitterer is indeed a person. The BK Twitterer goes by “King,” but as Popeyes VP-Communications and PR Alicia Thompson told Mashable’s Jennifer Van Grove, “The author of the Twitter character is too chicken to share his real identity.” She added that he or she (or it) sees Twitter, “as a way to stay abreast of what our consumers are up to, and to get a leg up on the competition.” Groan.

The Duffel Coat Crosses The Atlantic
Say it ain’t so! If you wore a duffel coat in my day complete strangers would come up and take the piss!

PI&C Collective Adds Wilmot
Senior creative Logan Wilmot has become a partner at Domenico Vitale’s new strategic and creative collective here known as People Ideas & Culture. Wilmot joins as co-founder and chief idea architect — the same titles that Vitale holds. He’ll be based in London and lead creative efforts at the new shop. “Logan’s unique experience, coupled with his leading our European presence, further proves our commitment to this new era in global communications,” said Vitale. PI&C will offer clients access to a pool of talent in advertising, fashion, music, content and Web creation, blogging, events and public relations. Some of it will be in-house, but PI&C will also tap outsiders when needed. PI&C will partner with New York design shop Bond to service clients. Bond, headed by director of design Joe Doucet, has taken a minority stake in PI&C and PI&C, led by chief idea architect Vitale, has taken a minority stake in Bond. The new operation opened this month.

Starbucks’ Volunteer Push Gets Boost From ‘Oprah Effect’
Starbucks’ campaign to promote volunteerism (and store traffic) got a huge bump today from no less than Oprah Winfrey — and by extension, Barack Obama. The talk-show host talked up the java giant’s “I’m In” campaign, which encourages consumers to pledge five hours of community service before the end of the year. Those who commit to doing so at Starbucks between now and Sunday will be rewarded with a free coffee.

Obama Staff Arrives to White House Stuck in Dark Ages of Technology
After running “the most technologically savvy presidential campaign in history,” President Obama’s staffers encountered “a jumble of disconnected phone lines, old computer software, and security regulations forbidding outside e-mail accounts” on their first day at their new jobs. “It is kind of like going from an Xbox to an Atari,” said Obama spokesman Bill Burton.

Shiner Beats Heinie
The idea came from McGarrah Jessee, Shiner Bock’s agency, which is in Austin, (near Shiner, home of the annual three-day Austin City Limits festival). The festival is sponsored by Heineken, and for those three days only Heineken and a few other are sold. “We were trying to think of inexpensive and cool ways to get into that arena,” says McGarrah’s Beau Hanson. What they came up with were koozies, or can coolers, and they produced 10,000 of them. The koozies looked exactly like cans of Shiner. So when a koozie was slipped over a can of another brand it would look as though that person was drinking a Shiner Bock. As patrons entered the festival, people from the agency were there handing them koozies. “People love koozies, especially when they’re free. They were gone in like four minutes, giant boxes, thousands. ” Standing back, looking at the entire crowd, it looked to the whole world like a lot of people were drinking Shiner Bock.

Audi Pre-Roll Ad has 70 Million Views
Audi, as the exclusive sponsor of the live webcast of Obama Inauguration CBSNews.com, MSNBC.com, ABCNews.com and the WashingtonPost.com, had expected 30 million views of its pre-roll advertisement titled “Progress.” Beet.TV has been told by a spokesperson for Audi USA that the pre-roll has been watched nearly 70 million times. Here’s the breakdown of views of the ad on the various sites provided by Audi: ABCNews.com, 15.9 million, CBSNews.com, 11.4 million; MSNBC.com, 16.3 million;The WashingtonPost, 14 million; Slate, 9 million and the Atlantic.com, 1.7 million.

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Obamas vs J. Crew

Obamas ring in inauguration with J.Crew
At today’s inauguration, Michelle Obama accessorized her yellow Isabel Toledo sheath with cashmere-lined green leather gloves from J.Crew, while daughters Malia and Sasha were dressed almost entirely in the retailer’s preppy fashions. But don’t rush out to the nearest J.Crew store to get the same look: The only items that came off the rack were Michelle’s gloves. The girls’ overcoats were designed exclusively for them and were made in “one-of-a-kind colors,” said J.Crew spokeswoman Margot Fooshee. “Some of the pieces, including the coats they were wearing, we’re looking at incorporating into our fall assortment for 2009,” Fooshee said. In recent months, Michelle Obama has been a vocal supporter of J.Crew, telling Jay Leno on the “Tonight Show” in October (while wearing a sweater, tank top and skirt by J.Crew): “We ladies, we know J.Crew. You can get some good stuff online.”

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Some inauguration viewers were fascinated by the historical tidbit that President Barack Obama took the oath of office on Abraham Lincoln’s Bible. Others were more interested in the J. Crew sage green leather gloves that Michelle Obama wore to hold the Bible for her husband — not to mention the pale pink and royal blue wool coats the Obamas’ daughters wore, also from J. Crew.
For media companies and marketers riding the wave of interest in President Obama’s inauguration with tie-ins, promotions and advertising, it amounted to a slam dunk. But some played it smarter than others. Audi, J. Crew Were Two of the Biggest Winners; Twitter Battled Delays.
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Experiential: IKEA’S Oval Office, Gap’s Pantone PopUp

Ikea Builds Own Oval Office for Obama
Ikea‘s got Obama fever. Taking example from other large brands—including Ben & Jerry’s and Hewlett-Packard—the Swedish home products retailer today kicked off an out-of-home ad campaign called “Embrace Change ’09” that honors President-elect Barack Obama. The effort centers on an Oval Office replica inside Union Station in Washington, D.C. Through Wednesday, those walking down Union Square’s Main Hall can see the Oval Office furnished with Ikea furniture. The integrated campaign includes out-of-home billboards featuring the “Embrace Change ‘09” slogan on local buses and trains. Ikea is also holding a “mock motorcade,” touring the D.C. area Jan. 15-16. Ikea will strap “furniture fit for a president” on top of vehicles to symbolize the incoming president and his family moving into their new home.

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This past weekend Gap and Pantone opened up a pop-up shop on 5th Ave in the company’s ‘concept store’ space. The shop will sell t-shirts in a range of Pantone hues. Pantone recently unveiled its pick for the 2009 color of the year called “Mimosa”. Pantone describes the color as having seven characteristics, optimistic, hopeful, reassuring, warm, cheerful, radiant, and versatile which they feel are the most relevant to the next twelve months. Gap has issued a Mimosa hued shirt that is only available at the store on 5th. Sounds like the rest of the line will show up for sale on the company’s website and other stores.
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Election: Social Media Roundup

The 2008 contest for the White House may go down in history as the first social media election. How else to explain the unprecedented role the Web played in this year’s Presidential contest, an influence scarcely imaginable just four years ago? In 2004 many social networking sites were just getting off the blocks. YouTube, for example, was introduced early the following year. And microblogging sites like Twitter wouldn’t emerge until the 2008 Presidential campaign was getting under way.
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Obama Victory Speech Viewed More Than 7M Times on Web
More than 78 million people watched election night on U.S. TV networks, according to Nielsen. And still clips of the historic night are proving big hits on YouTube. YouTube accounted for 98% of the views of Mr. Obama’s speech of the 150-odd video-sharing sites Visible Measures keeps tabs on. President-elect Barack Obama‘s victory speech has been uploaded more than 500 times and viewed more than 7 million times on the web in the last 48 hours, according to web analytics firm Visible Measures. By comparison, Mr. Obama’s “A More Perfect Union” has been uploaded 100 times since May and recieved 7.33 million views.

But this link denotes every expenditure made by the Obama Campaign, including their media buys by item.
Here’s another analysis of the media spend by the Obama campaign showing how much was spent on social media. One of the largest beneficiaries was Facebook even though overall media spend was small.
Barack Obama launched the official government Web site for the presidential transition on Thursday, giving it a look and feel that suggests the new president will utilize the Internet to a much greater degree than his predecessor. The site is a slightly more formal-looking incarnation of Obama’s campaign web site that features a blue-shaded presidential seal and a countdown clock to the Inauguration on January 20. There are biographies not only of Obama and Joe Biden, but also the directors of his transition team: John Podesta, Valerie Jarrett and Pete Rouse. The web site outlines Obama’s policy agenda, on issues from Iraq to social security to urban policy.
The Obama campaign’s “New Media” experts created a computer program that would allow a “flusher”–the term for a volunteer who rounds up nonvoters on Election Day–to know exactly who had, and had not, voted in real time. They dubbed it Project Houdini, because of the way names disappear off the list instantly once people are identified as they wait in line at their local polling station.
If Barack Obama ran for president by calling for a heavier hand of government, he also won by running one of the most entrepreneurial campaigns in history.
Michael Shaw of the always insightful blog BagNewsNotes writes about Obama’s use of Flickr and how Obama informally “friends” us via the site. (Of course, this is arguably a false or projected sense of familiarity.) A commenter submits that this “takes the implied intimacy of the ‘fireside chat’ to a new level.”
The brouhaha is nearly over and there will be one winner. Actually, there will be two. The 2008 US presidential election, dubbed ‘the YouTube Election’ by pundits, has been a triumph for digital media. Both John McCain of the Republican Party and his Democratic challenger Barack Obama have used an array of online channels from email to video to the full. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes joined Obama’s team last year, helping to create the first ever socially-networked presidential campaign.
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J. Crew v Michelle Obama

With a little bit of Gmail contextual wizardry, J. Crew is capitalizing on Obama and his wife Michelle with a google text ad that leads to a commerce-focused landing page. Its a smart move and I can almost forgive the copywriting, which reads, “All politics aside…this outfit gets our vote.”
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Popculture: Pepsi, Yes We Carve, Bacon Salt

How long does it take to remake an icon? Try five months.That’s the amount of time Pepsi took to revamp its famous logo, after top executives Indra Nooyi and Massimo d’Amore called for a “quantum leap” forward in transforming the soft-drink category and defining Pepsi as a cultural leader, said Frank Cooper, Pepsi’s VP-portfolio brands.
Pepsi‘s influencer outreach surrounding the rebranding campaign included Charlene Li from Forrester, who received a package from Pepsi with the history of the logo on cans…
Festive Barack Obama themed pumpkins. What else?

Bacon Salt
Big company efforts in social media have mostly failed to this point. Facebook‘s application platform has become a graveyard of failed attempts to harness the platform, while other brands have suffered embarrassments at their ham-handed attempts to influence the blog world. Yet for some small companies, social media has proven to be a godsend of low-cost, effective brand building. Take Bacon Salt, an unlikely product dreamed up last year after a night out drinking by two Seattle buddies. What began as a half-joking idea — what if there was a spice that made everything taste like bacon — soon became a bustling business that’s sold 600,000 units in 18 months, thanks mostly to the harnessing of the word-of-mouth power of social media.(tags: socialnetworking socialmedia branding baconsalt)

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