Android, Phil Toledano

Around 9am this morning, T-Mobile unveiled the first Android-powered “GPhone” to members of the press. See video of the event. The handset features a touch screen and a full QWERTY keyboard. It boasts a three megapixel camera, one-click contextual search and a zoom-ready browser, as well as wi-fi and 3G capability. Support for YouTube is built-in. All users will have access to Google’s Android Market. The unit costs $179 for existing T-Mobile customers. Pre-orders will be shipped to users around October 22. T-Mobile expects to unveil the phone in 27 3G markets by mid-November.

Phillip Toledano’s America: The Gift Shop
A great virtual exhibition from my old colleague Phil Toledano. “After eight years of government that’s left a sizable chip on America’s shoulder, it’s no big surprise that George W-era memorabilia isn’t exactly flooding the market. Enter Cool Hunting favorite, photographer Phillip Toledano with “America: The Gift Shop.” A virtual exhibition with clever takes on the subjects of torture, special rendition and government secrecy, the book features enough cheek to make you gasp, giggle or groan (depending on your politics).”
(tags: philtoledano “phil toledano” art photography popculture america)

George Bush: Damage To The “Special Relationship” (This isn’t a political blog, but…)

I don’t often write about politics on this blog, but a couple of articles in the UK press caught my eye. In an interview with the (London) Times at the outset of his trip to the UK, President Bush admitted “that his gun-slinging rhetoric made the world believe that he was a ‘guy really anxious for war’ in Iraq,” expressing “regret at the bitter divisions over the war.” The Times reported that Bush now aims “to leave his successor a legacy of international diplomacy for tackling Iran.”

Yet Bush’s attempt to heal old wounds seemed to fall on deaf ears.
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The (London) Independent also issued a scathing editorial today reflecting on Bush’s visit and his presidency: “[P]erhaps Mr. Bush’s most significant legacy, as far as Britain is concerned, will be the destruction of the instinctive trust of America and its leaders that once prevailed here. It is no exaggeration to say that Mr. Bush has done more damage to relations between our two nations than any president in living memory. This rupture is not an accident of circumstance; there are no impersonal forces of history to blame. This sorry state of affairs is the consequence of the actions of a single leader and his small coterie of advisers. … And whatever the future holds for transatlantic relations, there will be very few in this country who watched President Bush’s plane depart yesterday without a feeling of profound relief that the end of this disastrous presidency is finally in sight.”