Mashup: Historypin v Google Maps

Historypin, created by the social movement We Are What We Do, who are partners with Google, is a virtual time machine that allows users to take a peek at what the world looked like way back when. The website, which launched in London in June 2010 uses Google Maps and Street View tech and hopes to become the largest user-generated archive of historical images.

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Too Effing Modern: Location Based, Crowdsourcing

Location based social networks are the current darling of social media. Foursquare is leading the way with what seems like a new Fourtune 500 endorsement each week. It is unclear where all these tools will lead us. Foursquare, Gowalla, Whrrl, and even MyTown are getting a lot of attention and a lot of businesses, big and small, are experimenting.So let’s take a moment and capture what all has been done with these tools to date. How are big brands testing the space? What are brick and mortars playing with? Nothing earth shattering here, but the more businesses experiment in the space, the more we all learn.
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Crowdsourcing: Coke, Financial Review

Expedition 206 is a global program that has a presence on many social media marketing platforms. Coke used crowdsourcing to enable all of their consumers to vote on which team will travel the world for a year in search of what makes people happy. It’s a program that will be completely socially enabled. The team will blog, shoot video, conduct interviews and participate in events. Voting concluded and the three-person team of “Happiness Ambassadors” was announced online on November 16. The trip begins in January 2010.
To build buzz for next year’s ad campaign, The Australian Financial Review recently used a competition to crowdsource ad copy from readers. Dubbed Write Our Next Ad, the brief was for a short, sharp, clever ad that would resonate with the audience and promote the benefits of regular readership, while reflecting the brand’s focus on leadership, strength and inspiration.
Nicola Davies shares her thoughts on the matter …
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Nerds: Star Wars Fans, Star Trek Hands

A new crowdsourced initiative invites fans to remake Star Wars. People can sign up on Star Wars: Uncut to recreate up to three of the 1,313 fifteen-second clips that make up the epic space film. They then have 30 days to film and upload their segment before the slot is offered to someone else. The 337 contributions submitted so far range from live action and animation to stop motion and cardboard shadow-puppetry. Submissions can be viewed on Star Wars: Uncut, side-by-side with the original. Eventually, the site’s administrator—Casey Pugh, a Vimeo staff member—will stitch all of the pieces together, letting the project reach its ultimate goal of recreating the the entire movie.
Now you can share in the genius of extra terrestrial logic for yourself with this fine Live Long & Prosper Foam Hand. Simply insert hand and start waving.
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New Business Models: Instructables, Popcuts

  • A new restaurant project has joined the crowdsourcing fray: Arne Hendriks is asking fellow members of Instructables to participate in creating a restaurant in Amsterdam. In his words: “I will open an open-source restaurant that is completely made of, and only serves food based on the original instructables all the members on instructables.com have made or will make. I mean, every chair, dishwasher, menu card, light etc and all the food, will together be the restaurant. And I would like to ask you guys for your brilliant, funny, original ideas concerning all aspects restauranty. Inside the restaurant everything will be presented with the original instruction and accreditation to the maker.”
  • instructables

  • Popcuts is a new site that has a unique business model for its users. The approach essentially rewards trendsetters for spotting new music that later becomes popular. Let’s say you buy a song you like soon after the artist uploads it for the industry standard 99 cents; as it becomes popular you are rewarded for being an early fan and consumer. The credit you receive for your trend spotting is dependent on the point you jump on the bandwagon.