Twitter for Agency RFP

After splitting with JWT last year, JetBlue is searching for a new agency of record (AOR). Said VP-Marketing Marty St. George, “We’re pitching our advertising AOR. Curious on digital savvy …first test is how many of the agencies will find me on Twitter.” He also hashtagged it #sneaky. St George – who can be followed at @martysg – is an MIT grad that has been at JetBlue since 2006.
JetBlue’s marketing strategy has relied heavily on the web and social media in the past few years; using Twitter as a customer service tool (with over 1.6 million followers), Flickr to humanize the brand, and YouTube to inform and engage with customers. The airline made Ad Age’s America’s Hottest Brands list in 2009, and is recognized as a progressive marketer.
Maybe Marty is doing this to make a defining gesture about JetBlue and the pitch (good on ‘im) but I personally really don’t see how finding someone on Twitter indicates digital-savvy … I think my longwinded friend Jaffe concurs …

CMO 2.0 Interview with Marty St. George, CMO at JetBlue (socialmediatoday.com)
CMO 2.0 Conversation- How Jet Blue Won The JD Power Award (thecustomercollective.com)

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Twitter: Twelpforce, Acceptable Use

Says Barry Judge: “Last Sunday we launched “Twelpforce,” a new service that enlists the passion and knowledge of Best Buy’s vast employee base to bring assistance directly to customer computer screens via the micro blogging site, Twitter. Staffed by Best Buy employees from across all operations, including BlueShirts and Geek Squad, Twelpforce™ will answer product questions, troubleshoot technology challenges and solve customer service issues, all from the comfort of the users’ keyboard or mobile phone. Twelpforce has gotten a fair amount of awareness as evidenced by blog posts by both TechCrunch and Twitter themselves. Twelpforce is obviously an experiment. A very public one. And with this publicity comes a certain amount of risk. In my view, it is a risk well worth taking for many reasons.”
twelpforce
The UK government has unveiled its inaugural Twitter strategy document to encourage departments to get tweeting, but at a hefty 5,382 words it is the equivalent of more than 250 tweets. Created by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, it urges all government departments to get tweeting, while avoiding posting “pointless content”.
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