Madvertising

A Peek at the Real-Life Ad Campaigns Depicted on ‘Mad Men’”
With the new season of Mad Men here, Fast Company started reminiscing about the ad campaigns that Don Draper and his creatives worked on during the past two seasons. Sterling Cooper has devised ads and identities for such well-known brands as Kodak, Lucky Strike, and Playtex. The campaigns and pitch proposals vividly evoke the early 1960s and serve as key plot points. But what really happened to those brands and those campaigns back in the day? When did real life trump Mad Men? Read their article and find out.

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WebUrbanist also features a comprehensive collection of the product of the Golden Age of Advertising – beginning in the 50’s, a bit before the 60’s hey day that Mad Men takes place in – and highlights some of the key historical incidents that affected consumers’ psyche and attitudes towards brands and consumption of consumer goods during the time. A fascinating look at what captured Amercians’ hearts and minds back then – and a great contrast to the more sophisticated, two-way dialogue that brands need to have with more desensitized consumers now. Or would a return to some of these simpler, aspirational images and messages manage to inspire us and break through the clutter today?
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Twitter: Top Social Brand, New Agency

If sheer volume of conversation is any indication, Twitter is the hottest brand in the market. Twitter dominates a tech-heavy list of brands in our March 2009 Social Radar Top 50. The Social Radar Top 50 measures the most social brands by the number of unique topics of conversation. These brands are top of mind for consumers and bloggers today — Social Radar determined rankings according to the number of individual websites with at least one post about each brand to accurately capture the brand’s reach across the web.
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Carri Bugbee, the PR woman behind some of the much talked about twitter marketing of ‘Mad Men’, is to build a Twitter-based ad agency for media and entertainment companies. Bugbee, owner of Big Deal PR, was the face behind the Twitter account of ‘Mad Men’ character Peggy Olson, which helped create additional buzz for the critically acclaimed AMC series. Bugbee won a Shorty Award (in reference to the 140 character maximum used by Twitter), which rewards the “best content producers on Twitter”, last month for her tweets as Peggy Olson, who rose from being Don Draper‘s assistant to a copywriter in the Madison Avenue 1960-set drama.
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