Alex Bogusky Tells All (x2)

“Alex Bogusky, the Elvis of advertising,” writes FastCompany ” has left the business. Is this a New Age midlife crisis or his greatest rebranding campaign? The philosophy behind much advertising is based on the old observation that every man is really two men — the man he is and the man he wants to be. –– William Feather”
Alex gives his version of events on his blog …

Two Ad Students Make Cross-Country Pilgrimage to CPB
Meantimes, “two Miami Ad School students, Santiago Cosme and Vicor Javier Blanco, on September 3, plan to travel from New York to Boulder without spending a dime. The pair hope the kindness of strangers will feed, clothe, house and transport them to advertising nirvana.. Why? We have no idea. They aren’t even seeking a job at the agency as far as we can tell.  They’ve got a website, a Facebook page, a YouTube channel, a Twitter account and a Foursquare account. Whether or not the pair ever make it, we’ll know everything there is to know about their journey thanks to social media.”

Alex Bogusky interview in Fast company: the narcissism, the rancor, the cruelty (adland.tv)
Is Alex Bogusky a Sociopath? [Redemption Song] (gawker.com)
Alex Bogusky’s whopper advertising freakout (blogs.ft.com)
Bogusky, Creative Ad Star, Is Leaving Advertising (mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com)
For Alex Bogusky, Money is Never an Issue (adrants.com)

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Madvertising

A Peek at the Real-Life Ad Campaigns Depicted on ‘Mad Men’”
With the new season of Mad Men here, Fast Company started reminiscing about the ad campaigns that Don Draper and his creatives worked on during the past two seasons. Sterling Cooper has devised ads and identities for such well-known brands as Kodak, Lucky Strike, and Playtex. The campaigns and pitch proposals vividly evoke the early 1960s and serve as key plot points. But what really happened to those brands and those campaigns back in the day? When did real life trump Mad Men? Read their article and find out.

classic ads

WebUrbanist also features a comprehensive collection of the product of the Golden Age of Advertising – beginning in the 50’s, a bit before the 60’s hey day that Mad Men takes place in – and highlights some of the key historical incidents that affected consumers’ psyche and attitudes towards brands and consumption of consumer goods during the time. A fascinating look at what captured Amercians’ hearts and minds back then – and a great contrast to the more sophisticated, two-way dialogue that brands need to have with more desensitized consumers now. Or would a return to some of these simpler, aspirational images and messages manage to inspire us and break through the clutter today?
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