Available Online For fREE

AVAILABLE ONLINE FOR FREE: Selected works by Evan Roth 2003-2008
Evan Roth of Graffiti Research Lab is having his first solo exhibition at the Advanced Minority Gallery in Vienna, opening tonight. It’s also celebrating the release of his self published book AVAILABLE ONLINE FOR FREE: Selected works by Evan Roth 2003-2008. The book was made entirely in Linux using open source software and open typefaces. The physical book can be bought for $26, and in the spirit of open source can be downloaded for free.

evan roth available

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TV & Posters Redux

Seven years on – and with the internet amplifying the shift from “interruptive” to “engaging” advertising – branded content has exploded. And the good news for advertisers is there’s a format or idea to suit every budget – from low-cost hosting of videos and entertainment on the web, through staging festivals and shows such as the O2 Wireless event, and funding or sponsoring hit TV shows.

Poster Boy: Remixing Subway Ads
Poster Boy is a notorious street artist that remixes ads in New York City subway stations. Using simple tools – mainly just a razor blade, he cuts out images and text from advertisements, recontextualising them into a new hybrid artwork. The pieces generally have a critical edge to them, making comments on the state of society and on the advertisements themselves.
(tags: poster consumer art advertising)

Unsnobbycoffee, Moss Art

  • While Starbucks has cut jobs and stores this year, McDonald’s has been launching regional marketing to roll out its new specialty coffee drinks. In Seattle, the chain zeros in on coffee aficionados with its website, unsnobbycoffee.com. There, users can stage an intervention for friends who are “addicted to snobby iced espresso.” As Ad Age food reporter Emily Bryson York explains, it might take more than savings for McDonald’s to convert Seattle’s java elite.
  • dirty mcdonalds

  • It’s Nice That points us to a lovely bit of public art that just went up yesterday in London: The Mossberger Project by Anna Garforth uses moss as a tactile typeface, a sort of eco-grafitti that can be placed on walls, floors and other public spaces. Mossberger illustrates a verse from an Eleanor Stevens poem on a brick wall near Clissold Park in London. The project is part of YCN LIVE, a two-week long public and participatory art initiative currently underway in London. From the artist’s website: “Being interested in public art and ecology, it led me to thinking about sustainable grafitti. I collected a common moss that grows well on brick walls and glued it to the wall using a mixture of natural (bio active) yoghurt and sugar.” Mossberger will be on view until September 5th and continues on throughout London until September 7th.
  • moss art