Social Media: Facebook v Narcissists, Foursquare v Hyperactive/ Hyperpassive

A new study suggests that many Facebook users are narcissists with little to no self-confidence. York University researchers inspected the profiles of 100 students and concluded that those “with comparatively lower self-esteem scores and higher narcissism scores not only spent spent more time on Facebook, but also tended to ‘self-promote’ more than the students with higher self-esteem scores and lower narcissism scores,” reports the Huffington Post. It seems that a disproportionate amount of time spent uploading pictures, updating statuses, and appending information to one’s profile are all signifiers of insecurity and self-obsession. A more in-depth description of the study is available online—which is quite self-promoting of the researchers, isn’t it?


Two Types of Consumers Are Using Check-in Apps: Hyperactive and Hyperpassive
The two breeds are emerging and diverging, thanks to the onslaught of location-based services. What’s changing now is that mobile technologies are finally in place to meet both types of consumers. The hyperactive consumer is the one checking in everywhere on Foursquare, racking up badges and mayorships while leaving tips at every venue. The hyperpassive consumer is less of a known entity because there haven’t been as many options to serve him. The one with the most hype right now, if not the most promise, is Shopkick, an app that lets consumers earn kickbucks (all too reminiscent of Schrutebucks from “The Office“) just by walking into stores and potentially even walking into different departments and locations such as the dressing room.

Two Types of Consumers Are Using Check-in Apps: Hyperactive and Hyper-Passive (adage.com)
Facebook users ‘more narcissistic’ (telegraph.co.uk)
Facebook lures narcissistic, insecure: study (untreatableonline.com)
Facebook finds fans among the narcissistic and self-loathing: study (techvibes.com)
Facebook draws the narcissistic, insecure: Study (calgaryherald.com)
As Suspected, Facebook Is Popular With Bad People [Antisocial Network] (jezebel.com)
Study: Use Facebook Heavily? Then You’re A Vainglorious Malcontent. (crunchgear.com)
Narcissists, insecure people flock to Facebook: study (ctv.ca)
Are Facebook users really more narcissistic? (salon.com)
New Study Says Facebook Users are Narcissistic, Insecure (shoppingblog.com)
Narcissistic College Students Spend More Time on Facebook (psychcentral.com)
Facebook Activity Correlate To Low Self-Esteem & Narcissism (webguild.org)
Frequent Facebook-er? You could be a narcissist. (holykaw.alltop.com)

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Virtue v Vice

It seems my old mate Spencer Baim is kickin’ ass down at Virtue (the company he founded with Vice Magazine). The idea was to create a company that would add credible Vice-like mojo to brands and activate through Vice’s various media and experience channels. I just came across this article about “How Vice, and Virtue, Are Helping to Sell Brands” – seems they have picked up an AoR assignment …!
“Starting in January 2010, Virtue will serve as the agency of record for Palladium’s global creative and media accounts as the boot expands its relaunch campaign into countries like the U.K., Germany, Holland, Hong Kong, Japan, the Phillippines and Taiwan in the coming months, all markets where Vice has a presence.”

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Anti-Obesity Spokespeople: Homer, Frank & Thierry

Donut-addict Homer Simpson sponsored by DoH Change4Life anti-obesity initiative
The Department of Health has signed a deal to sponsor Channel 4’s coverage of The Simpsons to promote its £75m Change4Life anti-obesity initiative.

homer simpson anti-obesity
PepsiCo recruits footballers for anti-obesity ads
Frank Lampshade and Thierry Henry will spearhead an anti-obesity ad campaign for PepsiCo as part of the government’s wider Change4Life marketing strategy. The push has been launched by PepsiCo under the banner Play4Life, which is part of the government’s £75m ad campaign for healthy living. PepsiCo UK & Ireland houses brands such as Walkers Crisps, Tropicana and Quaker Oats in addition to the famous cola.

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Alex Bogusky Fears Only Mediocrity

If you have to be afraid of something, then fear mediocrity. Some very well written and inspiring advice from Alex Bogusky. Based on a conversation with what sounds like Ari Merkin, he also outlines some of his precepts for success in new business.

1.       Tell other people your dreams.

2.       The clients you currently have are your true new business machine

3.       Find some real passion in the building for the business or take a pass on it.

4.       Don’t model yourself after other agencies. Stop stealing all the decks from other shops to find a great pitch.

fear only mediocrity

I am definitely a fan of Crispin (who ain’t?) and while I haven’t always agreed with all Mr Bogusky’s opinions, this really struck a chord.

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    Out of Home: Shepard Fairey, Culture Commentary, 20ft Colon

    Artist Shepard Fairey has contributed to a new campaign from Lance Armstrong’s charity Livestrong. Armstrong’s ‘Livestrong: Hope Rides Again’ graphics announce “Defiance”, “Courage”, “Action” on the buildings in LA.
    livestrong-la
    Floyd Hayes sent this photo taken on Lafayette Avenue in Brooklyn. Could this develop into the next big cultural meme for expressing our collective distaste for mediocrity everywhere? Meh. It certainly has a nice ring to it.
    meh

    In Times Square, a 20-foot-long colon
    Yes, you read this right . In the advertising Mecca that is Times Square, it takes a lot to turn heads; in the most recent instance it was another body part, the colon. Bright red and pink, it’s a 20-foot-long, 8-foot high U-shaped colon that appeared in Times Square one day in late February. Passersby were invited to not only stare at it, which they did, but to walk through it. The colon, inflatable and portable, was put up by the Prevent Cancer Foundation to build awareness for Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, which is March, and then it’s off on a 12-city national tour for the Super Colon, as it’s called. Next week the exhibit will be in St. Louis, Portland, Ore., Philadelphia, Duarte, Calif., and Tampa.

    times-square-colon

    Photo by Brechtbug.

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    Snippets: Cheap Cigs, Web 2.d’Oh, Robotgalaxy, How ’bout dem Apple Apples?

    Financial Crisis Spurs Smoking Increase and Switch to Cheaper Brands
    More than three-quarters (77%) of current smokers in the US report that they have increased stress levels because of the economic crisis, and two-thirds of those smokers say this stress has had an effect on their smoking behavior, according to a survey from the American Legacy Foundation, conducted by Harris Interactive. The data indicates that stress over the economy is causing some smokers to delay attempts to quit, increase the number of cigarettes they are smoking, and/or switch to a less-expensive brand instead of quitting. In addition, the survey found that seven percent of stressed-out smokers who had quit are now smoking again, while nine percent of former smokers said the financial situation had tempted them to start smoking again.

    cheap-cigs

    Sprint’s out with a new site to promote their mobile broadband product. They attempt to show users how awesome the web is by doing their best to shoehorn every time-sucking thing on the web into one page.
    sprint
    Brothers who have endured endless hours waiting while their sisters shop happily at the American Girl Store will soon have their revenge: with the launch of ROBOTGALAXY’s personalized robots, boys will also get to engage in the interactive shopping experience.
    robotgalaxy
    A Japanese super-fan has grown Apple-branded Fuji apples by adhering stickers to the still-ripening fruits a month before picking. Apple has yet to comment about the unofficially-logo’d Fuji’s, but we doubt they will. That is, unless they don’t taste good. (Or constantly crash.)
    apple-apples
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    Bogusky’s Hypocrisy?

    I will come right out and admit that I am a fan of Alex Bogusky. I practically had a shrine to him in my office at Chiat after the MINI launch – as someone who was out there actually “doing it”. Is his new book (though laudable) a bit of a Dove v Axe move though? On the one hand espousing dieting, on the other hard-selling high fat and zillion-calorie meals?

    alex bogusky

    ‘Meatnormous’ Master Pens Diet Book (Ad Age’s Take)
    Alex Bogusky, one of the chief architects of Burger King’s audacious, effective but often gluttony-embracing advertising, has written a tome titled “The 9-Inch Diet,” focusing on the need for portion control and the damage done by Americans’ lack of discipline in that regard (complete with diagrams of large plates leading to large butts). The book, published by Brooklyn’s PowerHouse Books, is already preselling on Amazon, and was written “with a little help from” Chuck Porter, the other name above the door at Crispin Porter & Bogusky, which also handles marketing for pizza giant Domino’s. It’s hard to think of a more apparently dissonant moment in the annals of adland. As Ad Age sibling Creativity mused when it broke the story on creativity-online.com, it’s hard to imagine Martin Puris, author of “Ultimate Driving Machine,” suggesting we should drive less. I wish Bogusy would out his money where his mouth is and persuade his clients to re-think their offerings.