Ad Recession: Probably over. Pricecutters beware…

ZenithOptimedia is predicting global ad markets will increase 0.9% in 2010 to almost $448bn (£274bn) and expects ad expenditure to show steady improvement over the next three years, with growth of nearly 5% by 2012. The global spending prediction is the Publicis agency’s first upward revision in 18 months and comes after the worst ad decline in modern times. Zenith also predicts ad spend to fall 10.2% in 2009 to nearly $444bn.
US online advertising spending is set to drop this year for the first time since 2002. eMarketer estimates online ad spending will be down 4.6% this year. However, the slowly recovering economy, combined with basic structural changes in how marketers and the public use media, will lead to Internet ad spending growth in early 2010.
“It’s been denied, but I would rebut the denial,” Sorrell said, calling the practice “extremely dangerous in my view. It’s particularly dangerous if we see media price inflation.”
Possibly related:
Zenith Forecast: In ’09, Only Online Grows
(paidcontent.org)
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Sir Martin vs Enfatico

I took no pleasure in the news that Enfatico “failed”. (Enfatico, for some reason attracted a slew of detractors). I am not even sure of the status of the company (“folded in” … but how?) The website is still up, but the last blog entry is June 9th. I am a firm believer in a holistic approach to marketing, and I think that Enfatico was more a victim of circumstance than of hubris. Sir Martin has his own take on matters…
enfatico
During an interview with Forbes India, WPP‘s Martin Sorrell was asked a number of questions about Enfatico and why it didn’t work. His responses were pretty finger-pointy, especially when he was asked about the one-off agency’s demise:
Q: Why didn’t Enfatico work then?
Sorrell: Because it’s an extremely difficult thing to do. And the two prime movers behind it left Dell.
The two prime movers are of course former Dell CMO Mark Jarvis and Casey Jones, Dell’s vp of global marketing.
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Brand Extensions: Nokia v Money

Phone Company Becomes a Bank
Using the mobile financial service provider Obopay, Nokia is poised to revolutionize the world of banking through its new service Nokia Money. It’s reportedly very easy to use, and will facilitate all kinds of financial transactions, such as bill paying. They are also building a large network of Nokia Money agents, where consumers can come in person to deposit money or withdraw cash from their accounts. Users will pay 25 cents to send any amount of money up to $1000, and receiving a payment is free. Right now, Obopay only works in the US and India, but more information will be released at Nokia World in September.

nokia bank

[Picture credit: textually.org]

Nokia already owns the global cell-phone market. Now Tero Ojanperä is launching the world’s biggest delivery system for services, apps, and entertainment.
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Twittering Mumbai

Twitter is often criticized for being a forum to air the pointless details of our personal lives.  But Twitter also proved to be an astounding source of real-time reporting about the tragic terrorist incident in Mumbai.  Citizens on the ground in Mumbai not only reported and posted links to external news stories, they also shared helpful information like hotlines for people who want to inquire about the welfare of loved ones in Mumbai.  A search for Mumbai on Twitter uncovers a number of citizen journalist accounts unfolding and Razorfish’s Shiv Singh also links to a Mumbai news feed in on his Twitter page.

twitter-mumbai

via David Deal

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