Newspapers: John Rogers Says Future Not So Bleak, Chris Anderson Doesn’t Care. Meantime WSJ Is Cooking Up A LinkedIn Killer

Investor says future not so bleak for newspapers

A prominent US newspaper investor, and the largest investor in USA Today publisher Gannett, has said that the future for newspapers is brighter than many have predicted and that advertisers will return to print. John Rogers, CEO of Ariel Investments in Chicago made his comments to Bloomberg after Miami Herald publisher McClatchy and Gannett recently posted better than expected results.
Kertesz.Newspapers
Chris Anderson, the Wired editor-in-chief and author of ‘Free’, has had it with newspapers. No seriously, he’s through. He doesn’t care. And journalism? And Media? Kids those words are so passe. Anderson, who struck it big with his book ‘The Long Tail‘ and wants everything to be ‘Free’, has given a long interview to the German weekly Spiegel where he makes a string of provocative statements as he talks about the internet’s challenge to the traditional press.
The Wall Street Journal is to launch its own social network called WSJ Connect to rival the professionals’ community LinkedIn, according to reports. News Corporation‘s flagship title is looking to snap up some of LinkedIn’s 15m or so monthly visitors – recruiting Slingshot Labs to develop a website where professionals can create business contacts, search for jobs or find potential clients.
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What’s Working In Digital? Apparently Not Ads or Twitter…

Most People Don’t Like Internet Ads
While internet advertisers ramp up their web advertising efforts, the majority of US consumers say they are frustrated by common types of internet ads, according to (pdf) a recent study by Harris Interactive. Pop-ups, ads that are “moused over,” difficult-to-close ads, and musical ads are some of the worst offenders. Ads that spread across the page and cover the content beneath them are the most vexing for consumers, with 80% of respondents in the study deeming these types to be very frustrating, MarketingCharts reports. Ads on which consumers can’t find the skip or close button are a close second, with 79% of respondents similarly annoyed, the survey found.
Disney Did A Survey Anyways…
Researchers at a Walt Disney Co. facility in Austin, Texas, collect biometric data from test subjects as they look at online content to detect whether their eyes move to look at ad banners and how their reaction to ads plays out in terms of temperature, facial expression, heart rate and other factors. The work is designed to provide advertisers with a way of quantifying the effectiveness of online ads beyond the click-through measure.
giles hadman

Though Twitter is currently in the spotlight as a media darling, only 8% of advertisers and consumers think it’s a very effective promotion tool, according to (pdf) results from a LinkedIn Research Network/Harris Poll. The study also found that advertisers are more likely than consumers to know about Twitter and are more likely to believe in the microblogging tool’s future power to help promote products and services.
In the UK for the release of the latest Harry Potter movie, Warner Bros has decided to “use” Twitter. On a dedicated website Twitter users get the chance to send potions and cast spells on the people following them.
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