Mad Men shill for Unilever

Unilever Launches ‘Mad Men’ Blitz
Says a spokesman” “Unilever created the vignettes to showcase its iconic brands and celebrate their heritage on a hit show that is culturally relevant to consumers today. Consumers are craving nostalgia. The featured brands are prominent today and were popular in the 1960s, when ‘Mad Men’ is set.” Interestingly, the first reactions from viewers and bloggers haven’t been positive, with complaints about how the ads too closely mimic the show. On the “Mad Men” Facebook page: “Who is Dove soap trying to fool with that fake Mad Men commercial!? That is how I felt, like Dove was trying to steal Mad Men’s thunder!’.

And there’s more: “Despite hating the weak, we-suckered-you-into-watching-our commercial, Dove did generate some talk about … Still, subconsciously, I’m sure next time I buy soap I will see the Dove brand and automatically think SCAM ARTISTS and buy Ivory instead.” A blogger griped, “I usually love Dove commercials but I found this one to be way off-target from their ‘women loving themselves’ branding.

    Dove ‘Mad Men’ Commercial Causes Controversy; Unilever Says It’s Witty Parody (stylelist.com)
    Dove make ads just for Mad Men, women have the ideas, get no credit (adland.tv)
    More Fake ‘Mad Men’; More Real Ads (mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com)
    Advertising: Commercials in ‘Mad Men’ Style, Created for the Series (nytimes.com)

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    Apparel: Hipstery Mystery T-Shirt, Madmen Suits

    There are no t-shirt designs to choose from on Hipstery’s site. Instead, customers select a size, pay EUR 17 (plus shipping) and answer a series of questions about themselves. The Hipstery’s ‘style scientists’ run the responses to this quiz through their ‘innovative style algorithm’—both concepts which the site’s irreverent tone would lead us to interpret loosely—to select the right t-shirt from their exclusive range of designs, many of which are out-of-print shirts from small suppliers.
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    You can’t drink Patio diet cola anymore and you probably shouldn’t smoke in your office, but you can still live the “Mad Men” lifestyle by dressing in a new Brooks Brothers suit that is officially endorsed by that hit AMC drama. On Wednesday, Brooks Brothers announced that it would begin selling a limited-edition “Mad Men” suit, designed with the help of the show’s costume designer, Janie Bryant, and inspired by the tailoring favored by Don Draper and Roger Sterling.
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    MadMen vs Vanity Fair

    Whatever you think about MadMen, you can’t deny its impact on pop-culture … Adding to the excitement mounting over the new season of the show – which starts on August 16 – Vanity Fair has an in-depth analysis of the series and they also got Annie Leibovitz to shoot Jon Hamm and January Jones as their ad-biz alter-egoes for the latest issue.
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    [Thanks to PSFK]

    The Vanity Fair article opines:

    Mad Men is too clear-eyed about its period to be called nostalgic—Weiner loves writing anti-Semitic wisecracks for his admen and showing pregnant women with cigarettes dangling from their lips—but at the same time there can be a yearning tug, even an ache, in the intensity of the show’s backward gaze. Maybe it’s a kind of wised-up, at times even loathing nostalgia—precisely the kind of contradiction that drives the show creatively. Weiner has said in the past that the series is in some sense a tribute to his parents, an attempt in part at reconstructing their world. They were married in 1959, right at the dawn of the Mad Men era; the ceramic chip ’n’ dip that the anxious account executive Pete Campbell (played by Vincent Kartheiser) and his wife received as a wedding present in the first season was actually given to Weiner’s parents. Another touchstone is Weiner’s late maternal grandfather, a sharp dresser who worked in New York in the fur business (where Don got his start in advertising). Weiner told me he used to wear his grandfather’s sharkskin suits in high school, and, for the pilot, made a point of dressing an extra in his grandfather’s herringbone topcoat.

    One thing he quite consciously set out to do with Mad Men was to reclaim the 1950s and early 1960s from the condescension of “baby-boomer propaganda,” as he put it, the easy ironies with which the era has been caricatured in popular culture. “You know,” he continued, rattling off some cultural clichés, “Fun with Dick and Jane, the dad with the pipe, Ozzie & Harriet“—goofy and square and uptight and supposedly innocent, no one having sex, or good sex anyway, except for maybe Frank Sinatra. “We think everybody was walking around in corsets, but people are people,” Weiner said, and cited a 1968 episode of Firing Line he once saw in which a drunken Jack Kerouac was interviewed by William F. Buckley Jr. on the subject of “the hippie movement” and said to the younger generation, in essence, “You think you invented fucking?” Don Draper and his colleagues at Sterling Cooper, the women as well as the men, would seem to be asserting the same point.”

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    Twitter: Top Social Brand, New Agency

    If sheer volume of conversation is any indication, Twitter is the hottest brand in the market. Twitter dominates a tech-heavy list of brands in our March 2009 Social Radar Top 50. The Social Radar Top 50 measures the most social brands by the number of unique topics of conversation. These brands are top of mind for consumers and bloggers today — Social Radar determined rankings according to the number of individual websites with at least one post about each brand to accurately capture the brand’s reach across the web.
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    Carri Bugbee, the PR woman behind some of the much talked about twitter marketing of ‘Mad Men’, is to build a Twitter-based ad agency for media and entertainment companies. Bugbee, owner of Big Deal PR, was the face behind the Twitter account of ‘Mad Men’ character Peggy Olson, which helped create additional buzz for the critically acclaimed AMC series. Bugbee won a Shorty Award (in reference to the 140 character maximum used by Twitter), which rewards the “best content producers on Twitter”, last month for her tweets as Peggy Olson, who rose from being Don Draper‘s assistant to a copywriter in the Madison Avenue 1960-set drama.
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