Predictions for 2012

Tech Trends by Mashable’s Pete Cashmore (via CNN)

Social Media Trends by David Armano (via HBR)

Consumer Trends by Trendwatching

CES Trends (via IBT)

Cultural Trends by JWT

Cocktail Trends (via Fox Noise)

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Lionel Richie v Walkers (and Lineker)

I am pretty jaded about advertising, but AMV’s effort for Walkers – featuring Crooner Lionel Richie and former England Captain Gary Lineker – is actually funny and well done.

Unlike AMV to use celebrities, I know … (irony dear reader).

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Alex Bogusky Tells All (x2)

“Alex Bogusky, the Elvis of advertising,” writes FastCompany ” has left the business. Is this a New Age midlife crisis or his greatest rebranding campaign? The philosophy behind much advertising is based on the old observation that every man is really two men — the man he is and the man he wants to be. –– William Feather”
Alex gives his version of events on his blog …

Two Ad Students Make Cross-Country Pilgrimage to CPB
Meantimes, “two Miami Ad School students, Santiago Cosme and Vicor Javier Blanco, on September 3, plan to travel from New York to Boulder without spending a dime. The pair hope the kindness of strangers will feed, clothe, house and transport them to advertising nirvana.. Why? We have no idea. They aren’t even seeking a job at the agency as far as we can tell.  They’ve got a website, a Facebook page, a YouTube channel, a Twitter account and a Foursquare account. Whether or not the pair ever make it, we’ll know everything there is to know about their journey thanks to social media.”

Alex Bogusky interview in Fast company: the narcissism, the rancor, the cruelty (adland.tv)
Is Alex Bogusky a Sociopath? [Redemption Song] (gawker.com)
Alex Bogusky’s whopper advertising freakout (blogs.ft.com)
Bogusky, Creative Ad Star, Is Leaving Advertising (mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com)
For Alex Bogusky, Money is Never an Issue (adrants.com)

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Facebook

Facebook Fans worth $136 a piece.
A Facebook fan is worth about $136, according to a survey of the site’s users by Syncapse. A company’s fans spend more, are more likely to be loyal and will recommend the brand to their friends, according to the firm’s research.


How To Stand Out In The Facebook
There are nearly 500 million users on Facebook every month. And, according to Facebook, approximately 25 billion pieces of content are also shared on the site. That’s a lot of people and brands generating and sharing a lot of content.

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Gareth Kay gets a Real Job (Title)

Goodby Promotes Gareth Kay to Director of Brand Strategy
The inexorable rise of Gareth Kay. Always great to see one of the good guys getting to the top. And he’s rid himself of that perplexing title of “director of *digital* strategy” to boot. (Is digital strategy different? That’s a mindset rather than a different discipline, surely?)

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Beverage: Glen Rossie Rossi, Fucking Hell Beer, Coca Colla

“Glen Rossie has a tremendous whisky heritage and as we approach its 200th anniversary in 2014 we want to turn it into a global brand,” said David Birchall, chief executive of The Brand Cellar. Rossi signed up to become the face of the brand earlier this year, with Birchall claiming the rock legend can improve Glen Rossie’s success in overseas markets: “As ‘front man’ for the Glen Rossie brand, we believe he can help us reinvigorate sales not just in the UK but, as someone who has sold 118m records worldwide, overseas too.”

German Execs Win Rights to Best Beer Name Ever
An Upper Austrian village called Fucking, is the inspiration for a new beer called Fucking Hell. Yes, the common English term for surprise and/or frustration is now a brand name thanks to a German firm which has been granted permission by the European Union’s Trade Marks and Designs Registration Office to brew beer and produce clothing under the name.

A certain US soft drinks giant may disagree, but Bolivia has come up with a fizzy beverage it says is the real thing: Coca Colla. The drink, made from the coca leaf and named after the indigenous Colla people from Bolivia’s highlands, went on sale this week across the South American country. It is black, sweet and comes in a bottle with a red label – but similarities to Coca-Cola end there. One is a symbol of US-led globalisation and corporate might; the other could be considered a socialist-tinged affront to western imperialism. The first batch of 12,000 bottles, priced about $1.50 (96p) for half a litre, were distributed in the capital, La Paz, as well as Santa Cruz and Cochabamba. The familiar-sounding name and packaging may rile the Atlanta-based soft drinks manufacturer, but Coca Colla could also cause groans in Washington.
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Marketing: SoBe Ditches Creative Agency, Nissan Goes Experiential

The PepsiCo brand SoBe is developing a marketing strategy with digital agency Firstborn, public-relations firm Weber Shandwick and promotional group TracyLocke. “We’re not tied to the old methods,” said a brand official, noting that no creative agencies were considered as SoBe looks to content rather than advertising.PepsiCo-owned brand had been working with Arnell Group to produce TV spots that ran during the 2009 Super Bowl and last spring, but while the ads generated “a ton of awareness,” the company said they didn’t deliver the engagement the brand was looking for. “The passionate fans weren’t saying the things we thought they should be saying,” said Angelique Krembs, director-marketing for SoBe. “Going forward we needed to get to engagement. That’s why we evolved our approach.”

Nissan shifts marketing budget to experiential projects
Japanese car manufacturer Nissan is shifting its communications strategy away from traditional advertising, towards a greater emphasis on experiential marketing. It follows the marque’s decision to become the official automotive partner of The O2, replacing BMW, and the announcement that it is to set up an interactive brand centre at the East London venue.

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OK, so maybe digital agencies *are* able to lead …

I have penned (rather, copied and pasted) a few lines on this topic before … now I notice yet another article about whether Digital shops are ready to take lead agency /AoR positions for clients. This time AdWeek‘s Brian Morrissey chips in, saying that “Web Shops Go From Underdogs to Top Dogs”.

“While digital shops have fared better than their traditional counterparts in recent years, a hot-button question points to their still-debated status: Can these agencies move beyond their primary role of tech jockeys to become leaders of brand strategy? R/GA has attacked this question head on by winning lead agency assignments from Ameriprise Financial as its lead shop. Such assignments are still the exception to the rule. Yet the general expectation is that the number of these jobs will increase, particularly as digital initiatives become core not only as marketing channels, but as internal drivers of innovation.”

Well, a couple of things…

1. Does it make sense these days to differentiate digital and traditional shops (except by heritage)?

2. The brain drain from formerly-traditional agencies to formerly-internet-advertising agencies means that most of the smart money/ people are moving to the “digital” side. I think this thought-leadership migration will only continue.

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Ad Recession: Probably over. Pricecutters beware…

ZenithOptimedia is predicting global ad markets will increase 0.9% in 2010 to almost $448bn (£274bn) and expects ad expenditure to show steady improvement over the next three years, with growth of nearly 5% by 2012. The global spending prediction is the Publicis agency’s first upward revision in 18 months and comes after the worst ad decline in modern times. Zenith also predicts ad spend to fall 10.2% in 2009 to nearly $444bn.
US online advertising spending is set to drop this year for the first time since 2002. eMarketer estimates online ad spending will be down 4.6% this year. However, the slowly recovering economy, combined with basic structural changes in how marketers and the public use media, will lead to Internet ad spending growth in early 2010.
“It’s been denied, but I would rebut the denial,” Sorrell said, calling the practice “extremely dangerous in my view. It’s particularly dangerous if we see media price inflation.”
Possibly related:
Zenith Forecast: In ’09, Only Online Grows
(paidcontent.org)
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