Icons: Pat Fallon, Ty Montague, Jesus

In recognition of Pat Fallon’s years of hard work helping to build and cultivate the advertising industry in Minnesota, and in honor of his induction into the American Advertising Federation (AAF) Hall of Fame, Mayor R.T. Rybak has proclaimed March 25, 2010 to be ‘Pat Fallon Day’ in the city of Minneapolis.
JWT’s top two North American executives are departing the WPP-owned network to start their own agency. Rosemarie Ryan, JWT’s co-president since 2004, and Ty Montague, its chief creative officer and co-president since 2005, have had both successes and setbacks in their tenure at the shop. They are credited with leading a resurgence of sorts in JWT’s large New York headquarters, which has seen its creative reputation improve and was bolstered by a major influx of Microsoft business beginning in 2008. But the pair also oversaw the virtual shuttering of JWT’s storied Chicago office and the folding of its standalone Detroit operation into WPP’s hybrid “Team Detroit.” In the past year it has also parted ways with key Kellogg’s business and saw its Jet Blue account go into review.
That Kit Kat Jesus fake e-mail in full…

JWT Management Changes (online.wsj.com)
Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak Proclaims Today ‘Pat Fallon Day’ (eon.businesswire.com)
Crowdsourcery (farisyakob.typepad.com)

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Social Media: Adversaries, Ambassadors

Us vs them is one of the oldest, and most powerful marketing ideas. Apple is a quintessential example: from their beginnings they’ve portrayed themselves as the small guy against the big powerful bully. In 1983 it was IBM and more recently its been Microsoft. The company turns customers into evangelists who are more than happy to spread the word about the good fight, but how exactly does it work?


Starbucks Gets Its Business Brewing Again With Social Media ambassadors
Starbucks posted its first U.S. same-store sales gain in two years for the last quarter during a time when the company relied on digital and social-media promotions instead of what had become an annual TV blitz. The chain partnered with Pandora to sponsor holiday playlists, staged a Facebook sing-a-long and leveraged its partnership with Project RED to drive traffic to a dedicated microsite — and its stores, offering a free CD with a $15 purchase.

Photo Credit: Ivan Marquez

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eReaders: Apple’s iSlate v Hearst’s Skiff

Apple’s tablet will not only act as an e-reader for books, magazines and newspapers, but will play video, games and surf the web underscoring Apple chief executive Steve Jobs’ ambition to carve out a new market. The launch of the tablet is said to have been Jobs’ main focus since he returned to work after a six month medical break. Last month it was reported that Apple had been talking to book publishers about putting their content on an e-book platform.

Skiff Gives E-Reader Market Viable Ad Strategy
Another e-reader device – this time from a major magazine publisher – will hit the market sometime this year. Hearst previewed its new Skiff Reader at this week’s Consumer Electronics Show along with the announcement that Sprint is providing 3G connectivity for the e-reader and will sell it at Sprint retail outlets and Sprint.com.

Possibly Related:

Analysis: Could a tablet replace your notebook? (macworld.com)
Gorgeous iSlate design guess: reed-thin, button-free (dvice.com)
CES: When did the Tablet become the Slate? (timesonline.typepad.com)
Apple snubs Intel for tablet chips (venturebeat.com)
Microsoft’s Ballmer May Announce Tablet PC Tonight (microsoft-watch.com)
The e-Reader story of CES 2010 (engadget.com)
Skiff Reader to hit CES (ubergizmo.com)
Skiff and Sprint to Preview Skiff Reader at CES (shoppingblog.com)
Hearst-Backed Skiff Challenges Kindle With E-Book Ads, Videos (businessweek.com)
CES2010: Hearst’s Skiff Reader makes play for newspapers, magazines (seattlepi.com)
Skiff takes e-readers to new territory: flexible screens (dvice.com)
Report: Apple tablet coming in January (msnbc.msn.com)
Speculation has Apple tablet arriving in January (thestar.com)

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Brands & Marketers: Newcastle Brown departure, Kelloggs etchings, Microsoft clueless, DDR Nostalgia, Etsy’s Worst

Newcastle Brown Ale to move oot of Toon
In the same year that Newcastle United FC lost its top flight status, the Geordie Nation has suffered another blow with the announcement that the production of Newcastle Brown Ale is moving away from Tyneside after 82 years. Heineken, the Dutch brewer and owner of the iconic brew — affectionately nicknamed Dog — is shifting operations from Gateshead to the John Smith’s brewery in Tadcaster, North Yorkshire, as part of a cost-cutting exercise that will save between £13-£14m. While the brand is synonymous with Tyneside, sales in the US now eclipse those in the UK. Exports of the distinctive 550ml bottles with the blue star logo account for about 105m pints a year, while around 55m pints are sold in the UK.

newcastle-brown

Kellogg’s to laser-brand individual Corn Flakes in fight against fakes
Kellogg’s is to start branding individual Corn Flakes with the company logo in a bid to protect against imitation products. The food giant plans to burn the Kellogg’s signature on to individual flakes using a laser and will then insert a proportion of these branded flakes into each box. If the system proves successful, it could be used on Kellogg’s other cereal products, including Frosties, Special K and Crunchy Nut.

“No one really grasps how dysfunctional Microsoft has become,” the source continues. “Yes Microsoft did spend half a billion dollars for, as near as anyone can tell, absolutely nothing [ie, Danger]. Not exactly the first time. Asserting that it’s a ridiculous supposition is in no way disproving it.”
On Nov. 9, Germans will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, and many of them will be raising a glass of the country’s most popular sparkling wine, Rotkaeppchen, as they toast the achievements of 1989. The name means Little Red Riding Hood, and the brand is one of many former German Democratic Republic products that have survived and thrived in a unified Germany, helped along by a wave of nostalgia — or “ostalgie” — for all things associated with its communist past, but maintained in the long term by good old-fashioned capitalist marketing principles.
Regretsy catalogs some of the worst pieces to found on Etsy.com, the online marketplace for would-be craft mavens. Etsy has created an online marketplace for crafty geniuses–small-time makers of beautiful objects who’d otherwise remain unknown. But not everything on Etsy is great. Not by a long-shot. And that’s why there’s Regretsy. Tagline: “Handmade? Looks like you made it with your feet.” Here’s just three of the gems they dug up, and their comments, in italics.
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Viral: Longevity, Awards

# This kind of viral activity is only possible when there is repeat viewing. That means there’s something about these videos that make people want to watch again and again.
# They have a sense whimsy. “All of these are ‘feel good’ spots that are fun and don’t take themselves too seriously,”. They provide an escape.
# They all contain the bit of “how’d they do that?” and “is it real?” that many successful viral videos seem to employ.
# And finally, he notes, “Most of these have a deep musical connection, which definitely contributes positive associations. Just look at Apple’s iPod ads for this.”


Virals Recognized With Their Own Festival.
No longer relegated to living on YouTube, virals have become mainstream and need their due. So goes the thinking behind the second annual Viral Film Festival. The brainchild of French buzz agency Vanksen, the competition seeks to recognize the impact that virals have had in pop culture by giving them a home. The awards will cover the most outrageous clips in eight different categories, including user-generated, music and non-profit.

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Tablets: Apple, Microsoft

The excitement in the tech world about Apple‘s rumored iTablet (iPad?) is getting close to fever pitch, culminating with an article in The New York Times today. But all the evidence suggests that the seeds of the iTablet were planted decades ago–so we’ve made a timeline for you. A real Apple junkie would connect the rumors of the upcoming device all the way back to a conceptual movie made in 1987, during the reign of John Sculley. Yet apart from the failed–if amazingly visionary–Apple Newton Message Pad, Apple’s activity has only kicked into overdrive fairly recently.
macbook tablet
Rumors abound regarding Microsoft‘s “Project Pink” Zune smartphone, but the device since disappeared from the news. It’s back again, matched with exciting rumors of an MS Tablet PC.
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10 Branding Trends for ’10

Though US economists are cautiously predicting an uptick in consumer spending next year, the post-recession landscape will present brand marketers with new challenges, new engagement realities and new rules, and will increase pressure to prove how and why branded products deliver value, according to Dr. Robert Passikoff, president of Brand Keys.
supermarket
Using what Passikoff calls “predictive loyalty metrics” gleaned from consumer data his firm collects, Brandkeys analyzed the likely consumer values, needs and expectations for the next 12-18 months and offered the following 10 trends:
  1. Value is the new black: Consumer spending, even on sale items, will continue to be replaced by a reason-to-buy at all. This may spell  trouble for brands with no authentic meaning, whether high-end or low.
  2. Brands are increasingly a surrogate for value: What makes goods and services valuable will increasingly be what’s wrapped up in the brand and what it stands for.
  3. Brand differentiation is brand value: The unique meaning of a brand will increase in importance as generic
    features continue to propagate in the brand landscape. Awareness as a meaningful market force has long been obsolete, and differentiation will be critical for sales and profitability.
  4. “Because I said so” is over: Brand values can be established as a brand identity, but they must believably exist in the mind of the consumer. A brand can’t just say it stands for something and make it so. The consumer will decide, making it more important than ever for a brand to have measures of authenticity that will aid in brand differentiation and consumer engagement.
  5. Consumer expectations are growing: Brands are barely keeping up with consumer expectations now. Every day consumers adopt and devour the latest technologies and innovations, and hunger for more. Smarter marketers will identify and capitalize on unmet expectations. Those brands that understand where the strongest expectations exist will be the brands that survive and prosper.
  6. Old tricks don’t – and won’t – work anymore: Consumers are on to brands trying to play their emotions for profit. In the wake of the financial debacle of this past year, people are more aware then ever of the hollowness of bank ads that claim “we’re all in this together” when those same banks have rescinded their credit and turned their retirement plan into case studies. The same is true for insincere celebrity pairings – such as Seinfeld & Microsoft or Tiger Woods & Buick. Celebrity values and brand values instead need to be in concert.
  7. Consumers won’t need to know a brand to love it: As the buying space becomes even more online-driven and international (and uncontrolled by brands and corporations), front-end awareness will become less important. A brand with the right street credibility can go viral in days, with awareness following –  not leading – the conversation.
  8. It’s not just buzz: Conversation and community is increasingly important, and if consumers trust the community, they will extend trust to the brand. This means not just word of mouth, but the right word of mouth within the community. This has significant implications for future of customer service.
  9. Consumers talk with each other before talking with brands: Social networking and exchange of information outside of the brand space will increase. This – at least in theory – will mean more opportunities for brands to get involved in these spaces and meet customers where they are.
  10. Engagement is not a fad; It’s the way today’s consumers do business: Marketers will come to accept that there are four engagement methods: The platform (TV; online), the context (program; webpage), the message (ad or communication), and the experience (store/event). At the same time, they also will realize that brand engagement will become impossible using out-dated attitudinal models.
Another study from Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates, similarly proclaims that “value is the new black,” predicting that post-recession shoppers will transform into “value hunters” as they look for true value and meaning from brands, rather than just discounts.
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