Right Wing: Rove, Romney

Fox News contributor Karl Rove directed some unfriendly fire at the hosts of “Fox and Friends” this weekend when the show’s anchors decided to ask Rove to respond to protesters who disrupted the former top Bush adviser’s book tour.

Romney Struggles To Distance RomneyCare From ObamaCare: Was For it Before He Was Against It
Throughout the health care debate, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney has had to do a delicate political dance. The legislation that Congress ultimately passed and that President Obama signed into law closely mirrors the health care reform measure Massachusetts passed when Mitt Romney was governor in 2006. Thus, Romney has had to embrace his plan while at the same time, attacking Obama’s in an effort to appease the GOP and the conservative base, who adamantly oppose it. However, the similarities between the bills Romney and Obama signed into law coupled with the current staunch GOP opposition are proving to be difficult gaps to bridge for the former governor.

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Superbowl: Miller’s 1 Second Ad, Obama’s Ratings

Anheuser-Busch will have the only beer ads in the Feb. 1 Super Bowl, but rival MillerCoors plans a counterattack of TV and Web ads that make fun of such free spending, as well as a one-second stunt ad airing on local stations during the game. The pregame TV ads for Miller High Life start Jan. 26 and will tweak advertisers paying NBC $3 million — $100,000 a second — for a 30-second ad in the game. The ads will feature actor Windell Middlebrooks, the Miller High Life deliveryman in ads, and the timing is aimed at boosting sales for Super Sunday. “If we want people to drink our beer watching the big game, then we have to advertise before the big game,” says Andy England, chief marketing officer at MillerCoors.
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Election: Social Media Roundup

The 2008 contest for the White House may go down in history as the first social media election. How else to explain the unprecedented role the Web played in this year’s Presidential contest, an influence scarcely imaginable just four years ago? In 2004 many social networking sites were just getting off the blocks. YouTube, for example, was introduced early the following year. And microblogging sites like Twitter wouldn’t emerge until the 2008 Presidential campaign was getting under way.
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Obama Victory Speech Viewed More Than 7M Times on Web
More than 78 million people watched election night on U.S. TV networks, according to Nielsen. And still clips of the historic night are proving big hits on YouTube. YouTube accounted for 98% of the views of Mr. Obama’s speech of the 150-odd video-sharing sites Visible Measures keeps tabs on. President-elect Barack Obama‘s victory speech has been uploaded more than 500 times and viewed more than 7 million times on the web in the last 48 hours, according to web analytics firm Visible Measures. By comparison, Mr. Obama’s “A More Perfect Union” has been uploaded 100 times since May and recieved 7.33 million views.

But this link denotes every expenditure made by the Obama Campaign, including their media buys by item.
Here’s another analysis of the media spend by the Obama campaign showing how much was spent on social media. One of the largest beneficiaries was Facebook even though overall media spend was small.
Barack Obama launched the official government Web site for the presidential transition on Thursday, giving it a look and feel that suggests the new president will utilize the Internet to a much greater degree than his predecessor. The site is a slightly more formal-looking incarnation of Obama’s campaign web site that features a blue-shaded presidential seal and a countdown clock to the Inauguration on January 20. There are biographies not only of Obama and Joe Biden, but also the directors of his transition team: John Podesta, Valerie Jarrett and Pete Rouse. The web site outlines Obama’s policy agenda, on issues from Iraq to social security to urban policy.
The Obama campaign’s “New Media” experts created a computer program that would allow a “flusher”–the term for a volunteer who rounds up nonvoters on Election Day–to know exactly who had, and had not, voted in real time. They dubbed it Project Houdini, because of the way names disappear off the list instantly once people are identified as they wait in line at their local polling station.
If Barack Obama ran for president by calling for a heavier hand of government, he also won by running one of the most entrepreneurial campaigns in history.
Michael Shaw of the always insightful blog BagNewsNotes writes about Obama’s use of Flickr and how Obama informally “friends” us via the site. (Of course, this is arguably a false or projected sense of familiarity.) A commenter submits that this “takes the implied intimacy of the ‘fireside chat’ to a new level.”
The brouhaha is nearly over and there will be one winner. Actually, there will be two. The 2008 US presidential election, dubbed ‘the YouTube Election’ by pundits, has been a triumph for digital media. Both John McCain of the Republican Party and his Democratic challenger Barack Obama have used an array of online channels from email to video to the full. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes joined Obama’s team last year, helping to create the first ever socially-networked presidential campaign.
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Obama Won. I Am Relieved.

Gobama!
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Election 2008: The Social Networking Roundup
Before ballots were counted yesterday, Sen. Barack Obama led race for President across social network by nearly all measures, according to social computing expert and Forrester Research analyst Jeremiah Owyang, who posted social networking statistics for Sens. Barack Obama and John McCain on his blog, Web Strategy by Jeremiah – via MarketingCharts.

Obama’s Inspiration

Art, Design and Technology for Obama
Of the many history-making aspects of Obama’s run for President, the art and design that’s come out of it isn’t insignificant. From the identity of the campaign itself to Shepard Fairey’s pioneering grassroots poster, the Obama brand has taken on a life of its own.
(tags: technology president politics obama design culture creativity socialmedia)

Obama Delivers, McDonalds Delivers on Promise, Twiller, Greener Meetings, Honeyshed

  • Obama’s big speech pulls 38.4 million Obama’s Thursday speech, in which he accepted the Democratic nomination for president, drew the biggest audience for a Democratic speech in at least 12 years and perhaps ever, since Nielsen only began keeping detailed nightly records in 1996.Some 38.4 million total viewers tuned in across 10 networks for the speech, in which Obama became the first major-party black presidential nominee in U.S. history. Certainly the historic nature of his speech, delivered 45 years to the day after Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream,” drew in more viewers than would have usually tuned in for the convention.
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  • Customer: Can I have five barbecue sauces?
    Cashier: No. This is not Burger King. You cannot have it your way.
    –McDonald’s
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  • New York Times journalist Matt Richtel has invented a storytelling format called the Twiller. The idea is for Twitter users to follow fictional characters — which many already do anyway — as they progress though a plot. Richtel’s Twitter serial is “about a man who wakes up in the mountains of Colorado, suffering from amnesia, with a haunting feeling he is a murderer,” the author wrote. “In possession of only a cellphone that lets him Twitter, he uses the phone to tell his story of self-discovery, 140 characters at a time.” The main character is also accompanied by a hooker, who occasionally appropriates his phone and Twitters conflicting messages — warning people that he is a killer, for example. The narrative boasts multiple opportunities for interactivity. It weaves in and out of current events and occasionally solicits other Twitter users for help or advice — an outreach Adrants called “disingenuous” because Richtel does not “follow” other Twitter members.
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  • ProtonMedia announced today that it would be funding a non-profit “Go Green, Go Virtual” to promote virtual worlds as a carbon-saving alternative to constant travel for distributed workforces, promote virtual events and training over physical, advocate telecommuting, and encourage networked collaboration. The foundation will be funded through a percentage of ProtonMedia’s profits from licensing ProtoSphere with the money going “to support worthy organizations dedicated to promoting environmental responsibility through energy conservation and alternative energy use.” A worthy effort … although as we know Avatars have their own carbon footprint…
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  • Almost a year after the ad world first heard of Dave Droga’s plans to launch Honeyshed (and gave it very – shall we say – “mixed” reviees, the branded entertainment-meets-online shopping venture has named a CEO and is preparing to make the jump from beta to reality. Honeyshed’s premise is to make the online shopping experience entertaining and more social. Aimed squarely at Generation Y (the 18- to 35-year-old set), the goal of the website is to promote brands online, not by using banner ads, but via “Saturday Night Live”-esque themed vignettes that are paid for by the brands. Users can digitally window-shop products on channels such as “girl fashion” and “tech and toys,” then place their choices on a wish list of online purchases that Honeyshed dubs “my stash.”