eReaders: Apple’s iSlate v Hearst’s Skiff

Apple’s tablet will not only act as an e-reader for books, magazines and newspapers, but will play video, games and surf the web underscoring Apple chief executive Steve Jobs’ ambition to carve out a new market. The launch of the tablet is said to have been Jobs’ main focus since he returned to work after a six month medical break. Last month it was reported that Apple had been talking to book publishers about putting their content on an e-book platform.

Skiff Gives E-Reader Market Viable Ad Strategy
Another e-reader device – this time from a major magazine publisher – will hit the market sometime this year. Hearst previewed its new Skiff Reader at this week’s Consumer Electronics Show along with the announcement that Sprint is providing 3G connectivity for the e-reader and will sell it at Sprint retail outlets and Sprint.com.

Possibly Related:

Analysis: Could a tablet replace your notebook? (macworld.com)
Gorgeous iSlate design guess: reed-thin, button-free (dvice.com)
CES: When did the Tablet become the Slate? (timesonline.typepad.com)
Apple snubs Intel for tablet chips (venturebeat.com)
Microsoft’s Ballmer May Announce Tablet PC Tonight (microsoft-watch.com)
The e-Reader story of CES 2010 (engadget.com)
Skiff Reader to hit CES (ubergizmo.com)
Skiff and Sprint to Preview Skiff Reader at CES (shoppingblog.com)
Hearst-Backed Skiff Challenges Kindle With E-Book Ads, Videos (businessweek.com)
CES2010: Hearst’s Skiff Reader makes play for newspapers, magazines (seattlepi.com)
Skiff takes e-readers to new territory: flexible screens (dvice.com)
Report: Apple tablet coming in January (msnbc.msn.com)
Speculation has Apple tablet arriving in January (thestar.com)

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Books: Stephen King’s Treasure Hunt, Publishers’ Digital Aspirations

Stephen King’s Treasure Hunt
Stephen King’s latest epic is not due to be released until 10 November, but his UK publisher Hodder & Stoughton working with Unity London has launched what it describes as the biggest ever game of literary hide-and-seek. This enables hardcore horror fans to get their hands on it early… as long as they don’t mind a bit of interweb and real world treasure hunting. The 335,114 word novel has been broken down into 5,196 pieces, and, using clues given on the homepage participants are encouraged to hunt them down and deliver them back to the site. These extracts have been scattered across hundreds of websites and locations throughout the UK, including fan, horror, thriller and lifestyle websites. As pieces are found they will appear on http://www.stephenking.co.uk enabling fans to move them around and link them together, gradually forming bigger sections of the book.

stephen king under the dome

The Kindle may not necessarily be the e-reader to bring the technology into the mainstream. That said, publishers seem increasingly certain that the print medium may be in jeopardy, and so many are already experimenting with new multimedia technological enhancements, including FLIPS and Vooks
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Print Deathwatch: Magazines, Newspapers

Its farewell to magazines that quit print under pressure from recession and digital media. Some brands continue online, but many do not.
deadmags1

eMarketer Sounds Death Knell for Newspapers
US newspaper ad revenues are expected to drop 42.5% in the next seven years, signaling a death spiral for the medium as readership moves online and to more real-time, interactive venues, according to a report from eMarketer. In its report, “Newspapers in Crisis: Migrating Online,” the research firm estimates that newspaper advertising revenues dropped 16.4% to $37.9 billion in 2008 and expects that by 2012, those revenues will tumble to $28.4 billion – slightly more than one-half the industry’s revenue peak of $49.4 billion in 2005.

national_newspapers_montage

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