Beverage: Glen Rossie Rossi, Fucking Hell Beer, Coca Colla

“Glen Rossie has a tremendous whisky heritage and as we approach its 200th anniversary in 2014 we want to turn it into a global brand,” said David Birchall, chief executive of The Brand Cellar. Rossi signed up to become the face of the brand earlier this year, with Birchall claiming the rock legend can improve Glen Rossie’s success in overseas markets: “As ‘front man’ for the Glen Rossie brand, we believe he can help us reinvigorate sales not just in the UK but, as someone who has sold 118m records worldwide, overseas too.”

German Execs Win Rights to Best Beer Name Ever
An Upper Austrian village called Fucking, is the inspiration for a new beer called Fucking Hell. Yes, the common English term for surprise and/or frustration is now a brand name thanks to a German firm which has been granted permission by the European Union’s Trade Marks and Designs Registration Office to brew beer and produce clothing under the name.

A certain US soft drinks giant may disagree, but Bolivia has come up with a fizzy beverage it says is the real thing: Coca Colla. The drink, made from the coca leaf and named after the indigenous Colla people from Bolivia’s highlands, went on sale this week across the South American country. It is black, sweet and comes in a bottle with a red label – but similarities to Coca-Cola end there. One is a symbol of US-led globalisation and corporate might; the other could be considered a socialist-tinged affront to western imperialism. The first batch of 12,000 bottles, priced about $1.50 (96p) for half a litre, were distributed in the capital, La Paz, as well as Santa Cruz and Cochabamba. The familiar-sounding name and packaging may rile the Atlanta-based soft drinks manufacturer, but Coca Colla could also cause groans in Washington.
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(Lack of) Branding: Harris Tweed, Hyundai

Harris Tweed manufacturer cuts Scottish branding from US campaign
The largest manufacturer of Harris Tweed has removed all references of Scotland from its marketing campaign in the US due to fears that the Scottish government‘s release of the Lockerbie bomber could lead to a sales boycott by American consumers. Harris Tweed Hebrides plans to focus on the brand’s island heritage and has removed all references to Scotland and Scottish imagery from its promotional material ahead of the launch of its fashion collection in New York next month.

harris tweed

When construction began on a new subway station just outside Hyundai Card and Hyundai Capital‘s headquarters here, marketers at the South Korean financial-services company wanted to grab as much of the ad space as they could. They got it all, as well as the space in three adjacent stations and most of it in four of the 16 trains serving the new line subway line. The three-year deal cost $2.2 million. Once they had their new display space, the marketers made an unusual decision: They would leave it largely blank. Inside the stations, giant wall signs are all white, except for a small icon that symbolizes one of the company’s services, such as a car for car loans, plus a small company logo.
hyundai seoul subway
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Pub v Post Office

Pubs Become Delivery Centers
British brewery and pub chain Scottish & Newcastle are testing a scheme with the British post office that will see pubs used as delivery centers. The UseYourLocal service lets packages get redirected when the Post Office can’t deliver. It’s part of a scheme that aims to out the pub back into the community by offering more relevant services than keeping 17 year olds occupied on a Friday night. Springwise reports that about 500 pubs have joined the scheme.

Rovers_Return

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