AdZookie: Paint My House!

I was intrigued by AdZookie‘s marketing idea, promoting themselves with unique spectacular billboards … and reaching out to their small business target at the same time. Says AdZookie: “We’re looking for houses to paint. In fact, paint is an understatement. We’re looking for homes to turn into billboards.”

It definitely speaks to the times that the incentive is mortgage repayment …

Here’s their blurb:Adzookie is a FREE mobile advertising network. If you have a website and want to increase your visibilty we can help. We place free advertisements for your business where ads get noticed the most … on smartphones.”

Their website is here.

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iPad: Users Younger, Wealthier more Engaged

Users of the iPad and iPhone mobile devices, based on the iOS platform, tend to be younger and wealthier than typical mobile subscribers, according to a recent survey by The Nielsen Company. Only about 15% of iPad users are more than 56 years old compared to 33% of all mobile subscribers. However, while more than 10% of both iPad and iPhone users are 18-24, compared to less than 10% of all mobile subscribers, the most substantial difference occurs in the 25-36 age bracket. About 40% of iPad users and 30% of iPhone users fall into the 25-36 category, compared to about 20% of all mobile subscribers.

How Engaged? Tips to Up iPad Ad Interactivity Even More
Early advertisers on the iPad – Target, Dove and Ford Lincoln – all sounded the same trumpet call: their iPad campaigns had higher levels of user engagement than their online campaign counterparts. Since then research firms have been scrambling to quantify just how much more engaged iPad users are with advertisers. New figures come from Mobclix, which just launched the Mobclix Index, a new monthly series of infographics that aims to shed more light on the constantly shifting mobile ecosystem. Platforms including Apple‘s iPhone and iPad, Google Android, Research In Motion‘s BlackBerry and Windows Mobile 7 will be highlighted. Based on advertising data resulting from the total number of iPad ads served by Mobclix (300 million impressions per month on average), the Index finds that, yes, there is increased engagement on gaming apps played on the iPad versus the iPhone.

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iAd

Apple unveils iAd
Apple has revealed details of its new mobile advertising platform, allowing advertisers to run campaigns that “combine the emotion of TV with the interactivity of the web”, as the company targets delivering one billion ad impressions a day. The platform, called iAd, will be pre-installed in the new iPhone 4.0 operating system, set to be released this summer, and will give advertisers the ability to run full-screen video and interactive ad content without requiring the user to navigate away from an app.

What iAd Won’t Do For Marketers
For online marketers, there is a lot to like about Apple’s mobile ad platform, the iAd: an ad that stays inside the app doesn’t force the consumer to choose between the app or leaving the app to satisfy a passing curiosity about an ad (and guess who usually wins in that scenario).

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Mobile: Touchscreen, TwitterPeek, eReaders

The number of touchscreen mobile-phone users in the US has grown 159% during the past year – to 23.8 million in August 2009 – and has substantially outpaced the already-strong 63% growth of smartphone use, according to a study of touchscreen mobile phone adoption in the US by comScore, Inc.
iphone 159% growth
A new gadget designed specifically for people who want to tweet on the go was launched Tuesday by gadget maker Peek. The device, dubbed TwitterPeek, does one thing and one thing only: it lets people tweet. It doesn’t access e-mail. It doesn’t make phone calls. It tweets. That’s it. TwitterPeek, which looks like a smartphone, features a QWERTY keyboard and comes in black or aqua blue. The idea behind TwitterPeek is simple. After buying the device, users need only to input their Twitter credentials to get going. The gadget lets them tweet, reply, retweet, send direct messages, and download followers. It supports one account at a time. Users can also view TwitPics by clicking the “view content” option from the TwitterPeek menu. The company claims its battery lasts three to four days with average usage.
twitterpeek
In what appears to be indicative of Twitter’s success and growing popularity, a new gadget has hit the market that has been developed specifically – and solely – for users to send and receive tweets. TwitterPeek, a $99.95 device with a QWERTY keyboard, color screen and click-scroll wheel offered through Amazon.com, could prove to be the hot selling item for the holiday season. On one hand, it’s less expensive than a smartphone upgrade. On the other, it could also prove dud-worthy if demand never materializes.
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With the iPhone still the hottest smartphone, there’s much speculation about how its future will pan out. For some the money’s on gaming, but new research from Flurry is surprisingly different: eBook apps are overtaking games in the App Store.
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Tablets: Apple, Microsoft

The excitement in the tech world about Apple‘s rumored iTablet (iPad?) is getting close to fever pitch, culminating with an article in The New York Times today. But all the evidence suggests that the seeds of the iTablet were planted decades ago–so we’ve made a timeline for you. A real Apple junkie would connect the rumors of the upcoming device all the way back to a conceptual movie made in 1987, during the reign of John Sculley. Yet apart from the failed–if amazingly visionary–Apple Newton Message Pad, Apple’s activity has only kicked into overdrive fairly recently.
macbook tablet
Rumors abound regarding Microsoft‘s “Project Pink” Zune smartphone, but the device since disappeared from the news. It’s back again, matched with exciting rumors of an MS Tablet PC.
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iPhone leads in satisfaction … but where’s it made?

iPhone, Verizon Lead in Smartphone Satisfaction
Despite the traditionally high Blackberry penetration among business users, smartphones with more consumer-oriented functionality – such as the iPhone, Google’s Android and Palm Pre – score the highest in a customer satisfaction study (pdf) from CFI Group. The CFI Group Smartphone Satisfaction Study, based on surveys of more than 1,000 US smartphone users, also found little relationship between smartphone satisfaction and consumer satisfaction with network provider. Verizon and T-Mobile get top scores for satisfaction in this category, despite the fact that the iPhone is exclusive to AT&T.

iphone love

MIT’s Media Lab has designed a way to help you understand the economic and ecological implications behind different products you buy–it’s an interactive map that displays where each component came from. Specifically designed to be a “collective tool for transparency and sustainability,” SourceMap’s intended to demonstrate how important supply chains are, and what the consequences of each part of the chain work out to be. It’s set up like a social network, so that anyone from producers to end-users can take part (as long as you’re a registered member). Check out the demonstration video to get a better insight:
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Techno Deathmatch: iTablet vKindle, Pixi v iPhone

The hype around the iTablet is reaching a fever pitch with the Kindle increasingly looking like yet another example of Apple roadkill. If Apple can consume 32% of the profits in the mobile phone biz in less than three years, it should be no problem to swallow the nascent e-reader business in one quick bite. No sooner had Jeff Bezos graced the cover of Fast Company than the Kindle was pronounced dead by the digiterati (actually, it was “Kindle in Danger of Becoming E-books’ Betamax,” according to Brett Arends in the Wall Street Journal). With competition for e-readers heating up, will Jeff be able to defend his walled garden from rivals inside and outside the category that he built?
itablet

Palm Pixi v iPhone
Palm‘s Pre was heralded as a potential iPhone-killer well ahead of its launch, but in the end it didn’t quite deliver. Its performance was slightly ahead of the iPhone 3G, but lagged behind Apple’s revamped iPhone 3GS (aided in part by Apple’s enhanced iPhone firmware which works on all its smartphones). Then we heard rumors that Palm was working on another webOS phone, but it had possibly been delayed due to poor Pre sales. That phone was codenamed Eos and Pixie, and it’s turned out to be the new Palm Pixi–a candybar phone with much simpler design than the Pre. So much simpler, in fact, that it’s probably fairer to compare the Pixi’s performance to the older iPhone 3G–which is still on sale, and is Pixi’s closest competitor. Pixi’s less capable than the Pre, and priced more cheaply, and it makes even more sense.

Report: Steve Jobs concentrating on tablet (news.cnet.com)

Steve Jobs is Hard at Work on Apple Tablet (shoppingblog.com)

Analyst: iPhone secure against competitors, AT&T not so much (venturebeat.com)

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iPhone: The Hummer of cellphones

iPhones Overload AT&T’s Network, Angering Customers
“Slim and sleek as it is, the iPhone is really the Hummer of cellphones. It’s a data guzzler. Owners use them like minicomputers, which they are, and use them a lot. Not only do iPhone owners download applications, stream music and videos and browse the Web at higher rates than the average smartphone user, but the average iPhone owner can also use 10 times the network capacity used by the average smartphone user. “They don’t even realize how much data they’re using,” said Gene Munster, a senior securities analyst with Piper Jaffray. The result is dropped calls, spotty service, delayed text and voice messages and glacial download speeds as AT&T’s cellular network strains to meet the demand. Another result is outraged customers.”

erics huge iphone

Photo: Eric’s iPhone

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Lifecasting: Nokia, Taste, Robbers

The new Nokia Ovi vehicle is presented almost as if lifecasting is something Nokia’s invented. But in reality this is a simple Facebook front-end app, like one on any other smartphone. There are some geotagging extras, thanks to Ovi Maps and A-GPS tie-ins from the N97’s hardware, but frankly that’s nothing terribly amazing. Android phones, Palm’s Pre, and the iPhone do most of this already.
advert_lifecast_wordpress
If vintners can conduct wine tastings via Twitter, it stands to reason that restaurants could do much the same thing to promote their foods. Which is just where TasteCasting comes in, facilitating the use of social media for taste tests and other promotional events to help restaurateurs get tongues wagging about them throughout the socially networked world.
Users of social networking sites are giving away vital information about themselves and their whereabouts that is potentially being used by professional burglars to establish a list of targets, according to a new report from UK insurer Legal & General. “The Digital Criminal” report, which was prepared with assistance from reformed burglar Michael Fraser, found that nearly 38% of users of sites such as Facebook and Twitter have posted status updates detailing their holiday plans and one-third (33%) have posted status updates saying that they are away for the weekend.
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Augmented Reality: Metatags, Business Cards, Navigation Apps

Metaio’s Augmented Reality Metatags
Metaio’s code lets users leave AR notes, Tweets, images or even 3-D animations tagged to real world places, using a mix of geotagging, smartphone cameras and other Location-Based Service techniques. Other users, when viewing the world through a Metaio-enabled AR smartphone browser, would be able to discover the tag–and can even share it via a Facebook plugin.


Augmented Reality Business Cards
Augmented Reality Cards: No need to worry about folks with whom you’ve networked having to search their groggy memory of the night before. James Alliban, currently employed at Sky Creative in London, came up with a way to make it easier for people to put a face to a name. Using augmented reality technology, Alliban printed a grid of 3D colored panels that, when placed in front of a webcam, makes it appear as if a blocky version of himself is popping out of the paper card. As seen in this video, the digital Alliban talks a little bit about his resume, directs card-bearers to his blog, and plays around with his hands in a way reminiscent of David Blaine. Granted, not everyone has the skills to hack their business cards, but we can see this becoming a trend in the near future as more people leverage technology to stand out from the crowd.

AR Business Card from James Alliban on Vimeo.

Augmented Reality is coming soon to a life near you, thanks to the latest crop of sensor-equipped smartphones. Navigation is, perhaps, the most natural fit between AR and useful technology. Simply put, when you’re going somewhere, you need to know both where you are and where you’re going. You often need both pieces of information when you’re someplace unfamiliar and don’t know quite what your destination looks like. Cue AR: A technology that’s intimately tied with your location and that can access information sources that will improve your understanding of how to reach your destination.
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