Sir Martin vs Enfatico

I took no pleasure in the news that Enfatico “failed”. (Enfatico, for some reason attracted a slew of detractors). I am not even sure of the status of the company (“folded in” … but how?) The website is still up, but the last blog entry is June 9th. I am a firm believer in a holistic approach to marketing, and I think that Enfatico was more a victim of circumstance than of hubris. Sir Martin has his own take on matters…
enfatico
During an interview with Forbes India, WPP‘s Martin Sorrell was asked a number of questions about Enfatico and why it didn’t work. His responses were pretty finger-pointy, especially when he was asked about the one-off agency’s demise:
Q: Why didn’t Enfatico work then?
Sorrell: Because it’s an extremely difficult thing to do. And the two prime movers behind it left Dell.
The two prime movers are of course former Dell CMO Mark Jarvis and Casey Jones, Dell’s vp of global marketing.
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(Lack of) Branding: Harris Tweed, Hyundai

Harris Tweed manufacturer cuts Scottish branding from US campaign
The largest manufacturer of Harris Tweed has removed all references of Scotland from its marketing campaign in the US due to fears that the Scottish government‘s release of the Lockerbie bomber could lead to a sales boycott by American consumers. Harris Tweed Hebrides plans to focus on the brand’s island heritage and has removed all references to Scotland and Scottish imagery from its promotional material ahead of the launch of its fashion collection in New York next month.

harris tweed

When construction began on a new subway station just outside Hyundai Card and Hyundai Capital‘s headquarters here, marketers at the South Korean financial-services company wanted to grab as much of the ad space as they could. They got it all, as well as the space in three adjacent stations and most of it in four of the 16 trains serving the new line subway line. The three-year deal cost $2.2 million. Once they had their new display space, the marketers made an unusual decision: They would leave it largely blank. Inside the stations, giant wall signs are all white, except for a small icon that symbolizes one of the company’s services, such as a car for car loans, plus a small company logo.
hyundai seoul subway
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Inspiration: Cool Japanese Tin Toys

Cool tin cars from Japan. This selection from the Tanaka collection features 70 cars, airplanes, buses, spaceships, speedboats, and helicopters that provide a fascinating overview of the postwar Japanese tin-toy industry—a symbol of Japan’s startlingly rapid postwar rebirth—and of the Golden Age of automobile styling in the United States.
jap cars
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ISIPHO

Isipho (i-see-poh) sprang from the determination of 13-year-old Miranda Lynch to do everything possible to improve the life of two-year–old Amahle Zuma, and other children in iNzinga. Miranda and Amahle met in the summer of 2008 when Miranda and her father, Tom, were in South Africa for vacation and decided to spend one week volunteering. They spent that week living in the remote village of iNzinga, living with the Zuma family, planting potatoes in communal gardens and working in schools.
isipho
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That’s So Obama, Twitter Brands, Duffel Coat, PI&C, Starbucks v Oprah, Obama v Atari, Shiner, Audi

New Slang
Each year ushers in a bevy of new words you might hear and may even want to use (though you may choose to do so sparingly). 2009 ushers in a vocabulary inspired by pop culture and technology, and here are a few of the favorites heard from the streets, our bloggers, and Gen Ys who know…

My top vote?

Obama/Not Obama
adj. London street reporters proclaim that our new President has become synonymous with “cool”
“Yeah, that is so Obama!”

obama-shark-oops-too-cool

40 of the Best Twitter Brands and the People Behind Them
Mashable highlights the 40 best brand accounts on Twitter — including Ford, Jet Blue, Hertz and Home Depot — and the people behind them. Well, behind 38 of them. The only two identities Mashable doesn’t get to the bottom of are of the people behind the Burger King and Popeyes Chicken accounts. That is, if the Popeyes Twitterer is indeed a person. The BK Twitterer goes by “King,” but as Popeyes VP-Communications and PR Alicia Thompson told Mashable’s Jennifer Van Grove, “The author of the Twitter character is too chicken to share his real identity.” She added that he or she (or it) sees Twitter, “as a way to stay abreast of what our consumers are up to, and to get a leg up on the competition.” Groan.

The Duffel Coat Crosses The Atlantic
Say it ain’t so! If you wore a duffel coat in my day complete strangers would come up and take the piss!

PI&C Collective Adds Wilmot
Senior creative Logan Wilmot has become a partner at Domenico Vitale’s new strategic and creative collective here known as People Ideas & Culture. Wilmot joins as co-founder and chief idea architect — the same titles that Vitale holds. He’ll be based in London and lead creative efforts at the new shop. “Logan’s unique experience, coupled with his leading our European presence, further proves our commitment to this new era in global communications,” said Vitale. PI&C will offer clients access to a pool of talent in advertising, fashion, music, content and Web creation, blogging, events and public relations. Some of it will be in-house, but PI&C will also tap outsiders when needed. PI&C will partner with New York design shop Bond to service clients. Bond, headed by director of design Joe Doucet, has taken a minority stake in PI&C and PI&C, led by chief idea architect Vitale, has taken a minority stake in Bond. The new operation opened this month.

Starbucks’ Volunteer Push Gets Boost From ‘Oprah Effect’
Starbucks’ campaign to promote volunteerism (and store traffic) got a huge bump today from no less than Oprah Winfrey — and by extension, Barack Obama. The talk-show host talked up the java giant’s “I’m In” campaign, which encourages consumers to pledge five hours of community service before the end of the year. Those who commit to doing so at Starbucks between now and Sunday will be rewarded with a free coffee.

Obama Staff Arrives to White House Stuck in Dark Ages of Technology
After running “the most technologically savvy presidential campaign in history,” President Obama’s staffers encountered “a jumble of disconnected phone lines, old computer software, and security regulations forbidding outside e-mail accounts” on their first day at their new jobs. “It is kind of like going from an Xbox to an Atari,” said Obama spokesman Bill Burton.

Shiner Beats Heinie
The idea came from McGarrah Jessee, Shiner Bock’s agency, which is in Austin, (near Shiner, home of the annual three-day Austin City Limits festival). The festival is sponsored by Heineken, and for those three days only Heineken and a few other are sold. “We were trying to think of inexpensive and cool ways to get into that arena,” says McGarrah’s Beau Hanson. What they came up with were koozies, or can coolers, and they produced 10,000 of them. The koozies looked exactly like cans of Shiner. So when a koozie was slipped over a can of another brand it would look as though that person was drinking a Shiner Bock. As patrons entered the festival, people from the agency were there handing them koozies. “People love koozies, especially when they’re free. They were gone in like four minutes, giant boxes, thousands. ” Standing back, looking at the entire crowd, it looked to the whole world like a lot of people were drinking Shiner Bock.

Audi Pre-Roll Ad has 70 Million Views
Audi, as the exclusive sponsor of the live webcast of Obama Inauguration CBSNews.com, MSNBC.com, ABCNews.com and the WashingtonPost.com, had expected 30 million views of its pre-roll advertisement titled “Progress.” Beet.TV has been told by a spokesperson for Audi USA that the pre-roll has been watched nearly 70 million times. Here’s the breakdown of views of the ad on the various sites provided by Audi: ABCNews.com, 15.9 million, CBSNews.com, 11.4 million; MSNBC.com, 16.3 million;The WashingtonPost, 14 million; Slate, 9 million and the Atlantic.com, 1.7 million.

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