Alex Bogusky vs Success

Alex Bogusky learns from his successes
It appears Mr Bogusky has been imparting sage advice at my mate Brent Hodgins’ Mirren conference. “I’ve never learned anything from my mistakes,” Bogusky said. “Again, I hate conventional wisdom. Conventional wisdom is learning from your mistakes. What about learning from your successes? That’s where I’ve focused [my energies]. Like, this works, we better get down and study on this.”

I have to say I agree. Back in the Chiat days, Carl Johnson was always looking for projects/ groups/ processes that somehow worked, and tried to replicate them. In a big agency culture these successful groups or projects often get ground down by intransigence, inertia or received wisdom.

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Overcoming Creative Blocks, Keeping Innovation Alive

Scott Hansen has compiled a great list of tips and ideas to break out of the dreaded creative blocks we all encounter at one time or another. 25 different creative professionals all give their take on how to get back into the groove when faced with creative obstructions.

How to Kill Innovation: Keep Asking Questions
Sharing his thoughts in the Harvard Business Review, author Scott Anthony believes that content questioning is the real enemy of innovation. Anthony says that “What About…” questions – the ones which endlessly ponder every possible scenario and variable surrounding an idea or plan are what stops real innovation in its tracks.

And what’s the solution? Action.

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Future Children, The World According Today’s 9 Year Olds

Future-thinker Shane Hope explores the cultural and technological norms of the distant future, expressing them through the fictional schoolwork diaries of children in the era of “memochems, divvies, and exocortical existence.” His work with Compile-A-Child exists at the intersection of science fiction and imaginative childhood innocence, built on extensions and iterations of emerging themes in transhumanistic cognitive science.

(Video) The World According To 9 Year Olds
Questions include: identifying the most famous celebrities, their first computer interactions, and their fears. If nothing else, it will make you feel a bit older than you currently are.

The decade according to 9-year-olds from allison louie-garcia on Vimeo.

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Exploring the Ruins of Friendster

Exploring The Ruins Of Friendster
A recent Onion spoof highlights a fictional discovery of the ruins of the “Friendster Civilization.” An “Internet anthropologist” is seen describing a once-vibrant culture that seems to have vanished overnight. It’s a funny but interesting way to examine how we represent ourselves, and how future generations may see us (if having to decipher our culture based on social media profiles).

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2010: Trends, Ideas

Top Digital Marketing Trends for 2010: Flash, Crowdsourcing, Info-Art
As 2010 fast approaches, digital marketers are gearing up for yet another year of changes that will incorporate both the transformational and the incremental. From the economy’s influence on the burgeoning “do-it-yourself” culture to an increasing reliance on collective wisdom, information-based art, and remote computing, digital experts at Last Exit (via MarketingCharts) have put together the following list of top digital marketing trends they believe will play out in the year ahead.

2010 countdown

2010: The Year of the Good Idea

Judy Franks believes that if the industry can begin to look at the media landscape as a whole and less at its parts, and understand the ways in which it is changing, 2010 can still be the “year of the good idea.”

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Alex Bogusky Fears Only Mediocrity

If you have to be afraid of something, then fear mediocrity. Some very well written and inspiring advice from Alex Bogusky. Based on a conversation with what sounds like Ari Merkin, he also outlines some of his precepts for success in new business.

1.       Tell other people your dreams.

2.       The clients you currently have are your true new business machine

3.       Find some real passion in the building for the business or take a pass on it.

4.       Don’t model yourself after other agencies. Stop stealing all the decks from other shops to find a great pitch.

fear only mediocrity

I am definitely a fan of Crispin (who ain’t?) and while I haven’t always agreed with all Mr Bogusky’s opinions, this really struck a chord.

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    Hype Cycle 2009

    Gartner Inc has published the 2009 “Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies,” its effort to chart out what’s hot or not at the cutting edge of hi-tech jargon. It’s just one of an annual phalanx of reports that handicap some 1,650 technologies or trends in 79 different categories for how likely the terms are to make it into mainstream corporate parlance.
    gartner_hype_cycle

    Jackie Fenn, the report’s lead analyst and author of the 2008 book “Mastering the Hype Cycle,” delivers the main verdict: “Technologies at the Peak of Inflated Expectations during 2009 include cloud computing, e-books (such as from Amazon and Sony) and internet TV (for example, Hulu), while social software and microblogging sites (such as Twitter) have tipped over the peak and will soon experience disillusionment among corporate users.”

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    Green: Chevy Volt, Future Bikes

    The Chevy Volt Gets 230 MPG. So What?
    GM announced Tuesday that the much-ballyhooed plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volt will get 230 mpg. At first glance, that’s a mind-blowingly high rating, and GM knows it. That’s why the automaker’s early marketing campaign for the car touts the number. But what does it actually mean?

    2007 Chevrolet Volt Concept

    An Olympic cyclist puts together some of the coolest bike-tech out there to create a vision for the next-generation urban two-wheeler.
    chris boardman bike


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    New Microsoft Stores Look Exactly How You Would Expect…

    A highly detailed proposal for Microsoft‘s stores leaked online late Friday afternoon, and if it’s real, Redmond’s first foray into retail appears to be following the usual Microsoft formula … copy what Apple is doing and make it uncool. Oh and put a Surface table in.  Microsoft’s take on retail is exactly what you’d expect. The PowerPoint presentation (naturally) takes us on a journey of “Emily” through the Microsoft retail experience. Highlights include: an “Answer Bar,” a massive video wall around the whole store, community areas, and of course, plenty of computers to play with “Microsoft’s innovative technology.” Errr … OK …
    microsoft store
    microsoft store 2
    microsoft store 3
    Photos from Gizmodo.
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    Green Marketing: Starwood Chargepoints, Tesco Allotments, ReBurbia

    Element Lexington Tells Hybrid Drivers to Plug It In
    Starwood has partnered with Carbon Day Automotive to install a ChargePoint™ Networked Charging Station at Element Lexington. Hybrid-driving guests and travelers alike can charge their vehicles via the unobtrusive station, equipped with a universal plug-in for all kinds of electric vehicles, including cars, buses, Segway scooters, and bikes. Drivers can use Google maps to locate the station and determine whether it’s unoccupied.

    Tesco has stepped up its commitment to environmental issues by announcing plans to create allotments for recession-hit customers who want to grow their own vegetables. The supermarket giant has applied for planning permission for the 30 allotments on land next to its Southport store in Lancashire which, if granted, will see the sites rented out from next spring.

    tesco allotment

    Calling all future-forward architects, urban designers, renegade planners and imaginative engineers:
    Show us how you would re-invent the suburbs! What would a McMansion become if it weren’t a single-family dwelling? How could a vacant big box store be retrofitted for agriculture? What sort of design solutions can you come up with to facilitate car-free mobility, ‘burb-grown food, and local, renewable energy generation? We want to see how you’d design future-proof spaces and systems using the suburban structures of the present, from small-scale retrofits to large-scale restoration—the wilder the better!
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