Social Media: Uniqlo v Twitter, Heinz v Facebook, Tipp-Ex v YouTube

Japanese clothes retailer Uniqlo has found a novel way of encouraging U.K. shoppers give the brand a big presence on Twitter — by reducing the price of clothing pieces every time someone sends a tweet about an item. The “Lucky Counter” promotion has been running ahead of the relaunch of Uniqlo’s U.K. e-commerce site this week, and has seen the brand’s name appear in Twitter’s trending topics list for the country. In a web page dedicated to “Lucky Counter,” users can choose from 10 pieces they would like to see discounted on the website when it relaunches on September 9.
Consumerist points us to an interesting Heinz ketchup bottle that features an unusually prominent call to action, asking users to friend the brand on Facebook.

Tipp-Ex invites viewers to script ending in YouTube spot
An innovative use of YouTube by correction fluid brand Tipp-Ex offers viewers the chance to choose what happens next in a video clip after a reluctant hunter refuses to shoot a grizzly bear.

When tactics aren’t enough: the Tipp-Ex viral (asourceofinspiration.com)
An Interactive YouTube Campaign By Tipp-Ex (mindjumpers.com)
Uniqlo’s U.K. Twitter Campaign Looks to Be a Perfect Fit for Retailer (adage.com)
Adventures in Advertising: Youtube + Tipp-Ex (tech.fortune.cnn.com)
Tipp-Ex Lets You Make A Hunter Hump A Bear In Interactive YouTube Campaign (socialtimes.com)
This Week’s Best YouTube Ad Campaign: Tipp-Ex Impresses With Custom Interactive YouTube Video (reelseo.com)
Interaction Video Key To Viral Success (viralblog.com)
Boring Product, Great Ad: Tipp-Ex Channels Subservient Chicken (clickz.com)
Amazing New Interactive Youtube Campaign By Tipp-Ex – Bear Included (marketingconversation.com)
Interactive YouTube Video Clips The Next Trend For Viral Videos? (elliottlemenager.com)

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Wendy’s, Pepsi, Dell, Uniqlo

  • “Crazy Lettuce” has drawn less than 1100 views on YouTube, a mediocre rating (2 stars) and mixed response (of which there are 12). But lest we hasten to dub this a flop, agency Kirshenbaum Bond & Partners pointed out it spent a mere $25K of its client’s cash on this piece, as opposed to the $300K it might have to produce a TV ad. With the money it saved, it can disseminate 11 more of these turdy jewels, which makes online video a great medium for experimenting with new ad ideas, argues Silicon Alley Insider.
  • meatatarians

  • Omnicom Group’s Element 79 has lost the $120 million Quaker Oats account, believed to be the last piece of PepsiCo business housed at the agency. Earlier this year, Gatorade, Tostitos, Lays, Tropicana and Propel all departed the shop; including Quaker, the value of the combined accounts is estimated at $440 million. A Quaker spokeswoman said the account was placed into a review, and that Element 79 was not invited to participate. She said the pitch for the business would involve sibling Omnicom shops already on Pepsi’s agency roster.
  • Write something about Dell online, and chances are the company will know about it in an hour or so. Dis the company in a blog or a Facebook group, and someone from a crack response team may even chime in, if only to let everyone know that Dell cares.
  • Wakamaru, as it’s called seemed a little shy. At the moment, it can only respond to a handful of questions, none which involve helping you find a nice pair of pants. Though the robot will tell you it’s name, and that New York is it’s favorite city ever. But with all the sensors on it’s body, and fluid movements it looks like Wakamaru could have the potential to do a lot more.