The Future of Communications

<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies/savannah-2020-conference&#8221; title=”The Future of Communications” target=”_blank”>The Future of Communications</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies&#8221; target=”_blank”>Savannah Strategies</a></strong> </div>

Approaches to Interestingness: Nice Bottoms, Red Papers…

My colleague Justin Prunell alerted me to American Apparel’s contest…


Ogilvy Aims to Make White Papers More Exciting with ‘Red Papers’
Driven by its namesake’s forays into the publishing world, Ogilvy is launching a new series of tomes dubbed “The Red Papers”. The agency will talk shop about emerging marketing strategy. John Bell, head of Ogilvy’s 360 Degree Digital Influence group, professor at Johns Hopkins University is author of Red Papers’ piece, “Socialize the Enterprise.” You can subscribe for “Red Papers” free of charge.

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Digital: Facebook as Social Glue, Digital Creative, Conde’s Ads, Digital v Traditional Agencies

Today was extremely important for the Internet. Facebook announced that its “Like” button is going to appear on publisher sites all over the Internet. These buttons will populate a user’s profile in Facebook linking back to the originating site while also providing Facebook with even more immensely valuable, realtime data about its consumers. Here’s an Ad Age story covering the announcement (which includes my perspective) and below is my deeper analysis of the announcement and what it means for marketers, publishers and agencies.

What makes a great online display ad? Ashley Ringrose, co-founder of Soap Creative and curator of Bannerblog, has a few ideas. Among them: A truly interactive ad must have an interactive idea. That, and it should be useful, not annoying, to consumers.
Conde Nast’s digital arm is treading firmly on guarded agency turf by offering creative services to advertisers — even for ads that don’t run in Conde Nast properties, Advertising Age has learned. The glossy publisher’s in-house creative services group known as CND Studios is now accepting client assignments to craft ad campaigns regardless of placement. It is a significant shift for the company, which in the past has only done creative work for advertisers buying space on one of its publications, whether in print or online.

Battles between agencies leading to failure
The “battle” between digital and traditional agencies is contributing to the failure of many advertising campaigns, Kristi VandenBosch, ceo of Publicis & Hal Riney, has said. VandenBosch was speaking at the Ad:Tech conference in San Francisco, covered in more detail by Geoffrey Precourt, Warc’s US editor, here. She suggested that rather than providing a coordinated service for their clients, traditional and interactive agencies frequently ended up in conflict with one another. “Traditional and digital agencies are caught up with who gets to lead, but neither has earned the right,” said VandenBosch. “[Often] it is not a battle for leadership or control, but for who gets the credit.” The main cause of this situation is that traditional agencies generally emphasise “objects”, whereas their counterparts that primarily focus on new media tend to think in terms of “systems”.

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Marketing: SoBe Ditches Creative Agency, Nissan Goes Experiential

The PepsiCo brand SoBe is developing a marketing strategy with digital agency Firstborn, public-relations firm Weber Shandwick and promotional group TracyLocke. “We’re not tied to the old methods,” said a brand official, noting that no creative agencies were considered as SoBe looks to content rather than advertising.PepsiCo-owned brand had been working with Arnell Group to produce TV spots that ran during the 2009 Super Bowl and last spring, but while the ads generated “a ton of awareness,” the company said they didn’t deliver the engagement the brand was looking for. “The passionate fans weren’t saying the things we thought they should be saying,” said Angelique Krembs, director-marketing for SoBe. “Going forward we needed to get to engagement. That’s why we evolved our approach.”

Nissan shifts marketing budget to experiential projects
Japanese car manufacturer Nissan is shifting its communications strategy away from traditional advertising, towards a greater emphasis on experiential marketing. It follows the marque’s decision to become the official automotive partner of The O2, replacing BMW, and the announcement that it is to set up an interactive brand centre at the East London venue.

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People: Steven Grasse

Steven Grasse Does His Own Thing, or at least that’s what Piers thinks. At the recent PSFK New York Conference, (self described) “maverick creator-entrepreneur” Steven Grasse closed out the day’s discussions with a spirited talk about his journey from “disgruntled ad man to revolutionary businessman”. He spoke candidly about his inspirations, trials and tribulations, and his passion for living a life driven by art, authenticity, and conscience.

I have been an admirer of Mr Grasse’s work for some time, since seeing him and his team (from Giro as it used to be called) present credentials to my then-client Virgin Mobile. I had been particularly impressed with their Camel Lounges and work with Sailor Jerry. I later learned he invented one of my favorite drinks (Hendricks Gin). Such is the esteem in which I hold Mr Grasse I can (almost) forgive his rather strange views on English people…

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Social Media: Adversaries, Ambassadors

Us vs them is one of the oldest, and most powerful marketing ideas. Apple is a quintessential example: from their beginnings they’ve portrayed themselves as the small guy against the big powerful bully. In 1983 it was IBM and more recently its been Microsoft. The company turns customers into evangelists who are more than happy to spread the word about the good fight, but how exactly does it work?


Starbucks Gets Its Business Brewing Again With Social Media ambassadors
Starbucks posted its first U.S. same-store sales gain in two years for the last quarter during a time when the company relied on digital and social-media promotions instead of what had become an annual TV blitz. The chain partnered with Pandora to sponsor holiday playlists, staged a Facebook sing-a-long and leveraged its partnership with Project RED to drive traffic to a dedicated microsite — and its stores, offering a free CD with a $15 purchase.

Photo Credit: Ivan Marquez

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Twitter for Agency RFP

After splitting with JWT last year, JetBlue is searching for a new agency of record (AOR). Said VP-Marketing Marty St. George, “We’re pitching our advertising AOR. Curious on digital savvy …first test is how many of the agencies will find me on Twitter.” He also hashtagged it #sneaky. St George – who can be followed at @martysg – is an MIT grad that has been at JetBlue since 2006.
JetBlue’s marketing strategy has relied heavily on the web and social media in the past few years; using Twitter as a customer service tool (with over 1.6 million followers), Flickr to humanize the brand, and YouTube to inform and engage with customers. The airline made Ad Age’s America’s Hottest Brands list in 2009, and is recognized as a progressive marketer.
Maybe Marty is doing this to make a defining gesture about JetBlue and the pitch (good on ‘im) but I personally really don’t see how finding someone on Twitter indicates digital-savvy … I think my longwinded friend Jaffe concurs …

CMO 2.0 Interview with Marty St. George, CMO at JetBlue (socialmediatoday.com)
CMO 2.0 Conversation- How Jet Blue Won The JD Power Award (thecustomercollective.com)

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CPG: Campbell’s Neuromarketing, General Mills Kneejerk

General Mills spelled out its recipe for profitable growth: Hispanics, baby boomers and millennials. In a cliched and reactionary-sounding move, the Minneapolis package-food company revealed products and marketing plans designed specifically for those segments at the Consumer Analysts Group of New York conference this morning.
“We think our categories and our brands are well-positioned for strong future growth because they are on trend with the evolving consumer needs,” said Ian Friendly, chief operating officer and exec VP-U.S. retail. “We’re anticipating a rise in multicultural consumers, particularly Hispanics, plus a growing number of aging baby boomers and the emergence of millennials as the next generation with significant influence in the marketplace.” General Mills also has its eye on U.S. Census data — and is therefore aware that the Hispanic market will be driving 53% of the population growth between now and 2015.
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