2013 Trends – Consumer :: Media :: Technology

Advertisements

Social Media: Uniqlo v Twitter, Heinz v Facebook, Tipp-Ex v YouTube

Japanese clothes retailer Uniqlo has found a novel way of encouraging U.K. shoppers give the brand a big presence on Twitter — by reducing the price of clothing pieces every time someone sends a tweet about an item. The “Lucky Counter” promotion has been running ahead of the relaunch of Uniqlo’s U.K. e-commerce site this week, and has seen the brand’s name appear in Twitter’s trending topics list for the country. In a web page dedicated to “Lucky Counter,” users can choose from 10 pieces they would like to see discounted on the website when it relaunches on September 9.
Consumerist points us to an interesting Heinz ketchup bottle that features an unusually prominent call to action, asking users to friend the brand on Facebook.

Tipp-Ex invites viewers to script ending in YouTube spot
An innovative use of YouTube by correction fluid brand Tipp-Ex offers viewers the chance to choose what happens next in a video clip after a reluctant hunter refuses to shoot a grizzly bear.

When tactics aren’t enough: the Tipp-Ex viral (asourceofinspiration.com)
An Interactive YouTube Campaign By Tipp-Ex (mindjumpers.com)
Uniqlo’s U.K. Twitter Campaign Looks to Be a Perfect Fit for Retailer (adage.com)
Adventures in Advertising: Youtube + Tipp-Ex (tech.fortune.cnn.com)
Tipp-Ex Lets You Make A Hunter Hump A Bear In Interactive YouTube Campaign (socialtimes.com)
This Week’s Best YouTube Ad Campaign: Tipp-Ex Impresses With Custom Interactive YouTube Video (reelseo.com)
Interaction Video Key To Viral Success (viralblog.com)
Boring Product, Great Ad: Tipp-Ex Channels Subservient Chicken (clickz.com)
Amazing New Interactive Youtube Campaign By Tipp-Ex – Bear Included (marketingconversation.com)
Interactive YouTube Video Clips The Next Trend For Viral Videos? (elliottlemenager.com)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Social Media: Facebook v Narcissists, Foursquare v Hyperactive/ Hyperpassive

A new study suggests that many Facebook users are narcissists with little to no self-confidence. York University researchers inspected the profiles of 100 students and concluded that those “with comparatively lower self-esteem scores and higher narcissism scores not only spent spent more time on Facebook, but also tended to ‘self-promote’ more than the students with higher self-esteem scores and lower narcissism scores,” reports the Huffington Post. It seems that a disproportionate amount of time spent uploading pictures, updating statuses, and appending information to one’s profile are all signifiers of insecurity and self-obsession. A more in-depth description of the study is available online—which is quite self-promoting of the researchers, isn’t it?


Two Types of Consumers Are Using Check-in Apps: Hyperactive and Hyperpassive
The two breeds are emerging and diverging, thanks to the onslaught of location-based services. What’s changing now is that mobile technologies are finally in place to meet both types of consumers. The hyperactive consumer is the one checking in everywhere on Foursquare, racking up badges and mayorships while leaving tips at every venue. The hyperpassive consumer is less of a known entity because there haven’t been as many options to serve him. The one with the most hype right now, if not the most promise, is Shopkick, an app that lets consumers earn kickbucks (all too reminiscent of Schrutebucks from “The Office“) just by walking into stores and potentially even walking into different departments and locations such as the dressing room.

Two Types of Consumers Are Using Check-in Apps: Hyperactive and Hyper-Passive (adage.com)
Facebook users ‘more narcissistic’ (telegraph.co.uk)
Facebook lures narcissistic, insecure: study (untreatableonline.com)
Facebook finds fans among the narcissistic and self-loathing: study (techvibes.com)
Facebook draws the narcissistic, insecure: Study (calgaryherald.com)
As Suspected, Facebook Is Popular With Bad People [Antisocial Network] (jezebel.com)
Study: Use Facebook Heavily? Then You’re A Vainglorious Malcontent. (crunchgear.com)
Narcissists, insecure people flock to Facebook: study (ctv.ca)
Are Facebook users really more narcissistic? (salon.com)
New Study Says Facebook Users are Narcissistic, Insecure (shoppingblog.com)
Narcissistic College Students Spend More Time on Facebook (psychcentral.com)
Facebook Activity Correlate To Low Self-Esteem & Narcissism (webguild.org)
Frequent Facebook-er? You could be a narcissist. (holykaw.alltop.com)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Autmotive v Social: Ford Facebook Explorer, The Megane Experiment

Ford is the first car manufacturer to use Facebook rather than an auto show to reveal a new model, its Explorer SUV. Prior to the reveal, which took place online today (26 July), Ford had been using the Ford Explorer Facebook page to gain publicity for the car and now has more than 46,000 fans. A series of videos and events, including conversations about the new car with Ford executives that replicate the experience consumers would have at an actual auto show, are available to watch through a live video link on the page. As part of the campaign, Ford will give away an Explorer to one of its Facebook fans, picked at random.


The Megane Experiment
Renault marketing strategy associates Renault with Gallic culture, akin to its “Nicole and Papa” ads of the 80s and 90s. The aim of the campaign is to improve UK sales of the Megane saloon. Ads will contrast the Côte d’Azur resort of Menton with Gisburn in Lancashire to establish which has the greatest “joie de vivre”. The tongue-in-cheek spots will compare a swimming pool in Menton with a puddle in Gisburn, and show a French couple at a sunny seaside restaurant and a British couple outside a pub in bad weather. A 10-day teaser TV and print campaign, launching this week, will claim Menton contains more than 21 Meganes, while Gisburn has none. Consumers will be directed to a website at themeganeexperiment.com, which will follow the journey of Claude as he drives a Megane from Menton to Lancashire. From next month, a follow-up TV, print, radio and digital push will follow Renault’s attempts to give Gisburn greater joie de vivre. Extra content will be avail-able on YouTube and Renault TV. I disagree that the French have “joie de vivre” though: generally they are chain smoking, shrugging and miserable.

Ford Reveals 2011 Ford Explorer on Facebook (offonatangent.blogspot.com)
2011 Ford Explorer REVEALED: Can This New Model Save The SUV? (PHOTOS) (huffingtonpost.com)
Ford Shows Off New Explorer to Facebook Fans with Full Day Of Content (insidefacebook.com)
Ford to unveil 2011 Explorer on Facebook (reviews.cnet.com)
2011 Ford Explorer Changes The Game (ridelust.com)
Ford to unveil redesigned model on Facebook (newstatesman.com)
Scott Meis: Ford Facebook Reveal Day = Smart Digital Launch (scottmeis.com)
Ford unveils lighter version of Explorer (kansas.com)
Inside the 2011 Ford Explorer Facebook Reveal (mashable.com)
OMG LOL: 2011 Ford Explorer to get Facebook reveal (autoblog.com)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Second Life: Now for iPad, but not for Tameside …

Ah, Second Life. Unfortunately, it ain’t what she used to be. The brands all left, there have been more than a few virtual scandals in recent years, user numbers have fallen off (as have staff numbers, after a 30% staff layoff) and the newest official Linden Labs viewer software didn’t exactly get rave reviews. However, there is still a relatively large and loyal SL contingent that is eager to access their digitized world wherever and whenever they can. Enter the Pocket Metaverse iPad App for  Second Life. Some people have been begging and pleading for a reliable Second Life viewer for the iPhone since day one. Those same people really began clamoring for something more mobile when the iPad came on the scene. Pocket Metaverse Pro ($2.99) is just that app. With versions for the iPad and iPhone (and free versions to boot), Pocket Metaverse is more than adequate for accessing Second Life and other similar Open Grid virtual worlds while on the go.

Not everyone’s a fan of SL though, notably the good people of Tameside, whose Council just scrapped a £36,000 virtual town hall in Second Life. Tameside Council, in Greater Manchester, ‘rented’ an island in the virtual world of Second Life and built a computerised town hall, hoping it would encourage users to access local authority services. But the project has been abandoned after council chiefs admitted they could not justify the cost.

IT council chiefs ditch Sadville after splurging £36k (go.theregister.com)
Council scraps £36,000 virtual town hall in Second Life (telegraph.co.uk)
Council’s £36,000 on ‘virtual’ HQ (thesun.co.uk)
Linden Lab guns for service-based Second Life viewers (massively.com)
Linden Lab Fail. (rcaston.com)
Second Life Owner Linden Lab to Lay Off 30% of Its Workers (dailyfinance.com)

Enhanced by Zemanta