Beer Turnstile lets partygoers travel home free on Metro

Carnival in Rio is exuberant and outrageous. With two million people attending each day, Rio becomes a place where anything goes and alcohol flows. Drink-driving incidents increase by 50% during the period.

Carnival in Rio is exuberant and outrageous. With two million people attending each day, Rio becomes a place where anything goes and alcohol flows. Drink-driving incidents increase by 50% during the period.   To live up to their ‘Don’t Drink and Drive’ effort, Antarctica Beer decided to help carnivalgoers get home safely after drinking. To do this they created the ‘Beer Turnstile’ at metro stations which accepted (presumably empty) Antarctica beer cans as tickets.   All passengers had to do was scan the bar code on the beer can, and the turnstile unlocked. All the beer cans collected were then donated for recycling.  This effective campaign took advantage of a potentially dangerous behavior, and leveraged innovative technology to provide brand utility and promote safety.   The Beer Turnstile received an average of a thousand passengers an hour and the number of drunk drivers caught went down by 43%.

To live up to their ‘Don’t Drink and Drive’ effort, Antarctica Beer decided to help carnivalgoers get home safely after drinking. To do this they created the ‘Beer Turnstile’ at metro stations which accepted (presumably empty) Antarctica beer cans as tickets.

All passengers had to do was scan the bar code on the beer can, and the turnstile unlocked. All the beer cans collected were then donated for recycling.

This effective campaign took advantage of a potentially dangerous behavior, and leveraged innovative technology to provide brand utility and promote safety.

The Beer Turnstile received an average of a thousand passengers an hour and the number of drunk drivers caught went down by 43%.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL

With the advent of always-on, ubiquitous internet access, and digitization, our actual and virtual lives are increasingly starting to blend into one.

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The Future of Communications

<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies/savannah-2020-conference&#8221; title=”The Future of Communications” target=”_blank”>The Future of Communications</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/savannah-strategies&#8221; target=”_blank”>Savannah Strategies</a></strong> </div>

Five Reasons Top Talent Leave Their Jobs

Very nice infographic that nails the key issues.

Image Credit: ioVentures Inc.

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Predictions for 2012

Tech Trends by Mashable’s Pete Cashmore (via CNN)

Social Media Trends by David Armano (via HBR)

Consumer Trends by Trendwatching

CES Trends (via IBT)

Cultural Trends by JWT

Cocktail Trends (via Fox Noise)

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DON’T FRACK NEW YORK: Dangers of Hydraulic Fracturing

Josh Fox‘s new movie vividly dramatizes the dangers of Hydraulic Fracturing. The other month I saw a screening of the movie in upstate New York – at once ground central for proposed Gas and New York’s main aquifer – and it makes for grim viewing.

Hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”) is a means of natural gas extraction employed in deep natural gas well drilling. Once a well is drilled, millions of gallons of water, sand and proprietary chemicals are injected, under high pressure, into a well. The pressure fractures the shale and props open fissures that enable natural gas to flow more freely out of the well.

Horizontal hydrofracking is a means of tapping shale deposits containing natural gas that were previously inaccessible by conventional drilling. Vertical hydrofracking is used to extend the life of an existing well once its productivity starts to run out, sort of a last resort. Horizontal fracking differs in that it uses a mixture of 596 chemicals, many of them proprietary, and millions of gallons of water per frack. This water then becomes contaminated and must be cleaned and disposed of.

What is the Halliburton Loophole?

In 2005, the Bush/ Cheney Energy Bill exempted natural gas drilling from the Safe Drinking Water Act. It exempts companies from disclosing the chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing. Essentially, the provision took the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) off the job. It is now commonly referred to as the Halliburton Loophole.

What is the Safe Drinking Water Act?

In 1974, the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) was passed by Congress to ensure clean drinking water free from both natural and man-made contaminates.

What is the FRAC Act?

The FRAC Act (Fracturing Responsibility and Awareness to Chemical Act) is a House bill intended to repeal the Halliburton Loophole and to require the natural gas industry to disclose the chemicals they use.

How deep do natural gas wells go?

The average well is up to 8,000 feet deep. The depth of drinking water aquifers is about 1,000 feet. The problems typically stem from poor cement well casings that leak natural gas as well as fracking fluid into water wells.

How much water is used during the fracking process?

Generally 1-8 million gallons of water may be used to frack a well. A well may be fracked up to 18 times.

What fluids are used in the fracking process?

For each frack, 80-300 tons of chemicals may be used. Presently, the natural gas industry does not have to disclose the chemicals used, but scientists have identified volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene.

In what form does the natural gas come out of the well?

The gas comes up wet in produced water and has to be separated from the wastewater on the surface. Only 30-50% of the water is typically recovered from a well. This wastewater can be highly toxic.

What is done with the wastewater?

Evaporators evaporate off VOCs and condensate tanks steam off VOCs, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The wastewater is then trucked to water treatment facilities.

What is a well’s potential to cause air pollution?

As the VOCs are evaporated and come into contact with diesel exhaust from trucks and generators at the well site, ground level ozone is produced. Ozone plumes can travel up to 250 miles.

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AdZookie: Paint My House!

I was intrigued by AdZookie‘s marketing idea, promoting themselves with unique spectacular billboards … and reaching out to their small business target at the same time. Says AdZookie: “We’re looking for houses to paint. In fact, paint is an understatement. We’re looking for homes to turn into billboards.”

It definitely speaks to the times that the incentive is mortgage repayment …

Here’s their blurb:Adzookie is a FREE mobile advertising network. If you have a website and want to increase your visibilty we can help. We place free advertisements for your business where ads get noticed the most … on smartphones.”

Their website is here.

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Howard Schultz: “Onward”

So Howard’s people sent me a review copy of his book today. One assumes that reaching out to marketing bloggers was part of the launch strategy (I’m all in favor of that!) I was also interested to see copies of his book floating around Starbucks outlets (hey, if you have a massive retail footprint, why not use it?)

I confess I have not yet read the book but please check back for some deathless prose on the subject!

Here’s the blurb:

ONWARD
How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul
by Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks
March 29, 2011, Rodale

In 2008, Howard Schultz made the unprecedented decision to return as the CEO eight years after he stepped down from daily oversight of the company and became chairman. Concerned that the Starbucks experience had been compromised by its quest for growth, Schultz was determined to help it return to its core values and restore its financial health. In ONWARD, he shares the remarkable story of his return and the company’s ongoing transformation under his leadership, revealing how, during one of the most tumultuous economic times in history, Starbucks again achieved profitability and sustain­ability.

Schultz not only had to act fast and aggressively on a global scale, but had to look in the mirror, confront the company’s blemishes and search for answers to such hard questions as:

·    How can you evolve your brand—especially an iconic one—to be relevant to a new age while being true to its roots?
·    How can you grow a company without losing an intimate relationship with each customer
·    How can you revive your employees’ passion for your company’s founding principles?

There was no easy roadmap and plenty of risks. From a leaked memo that exposed Starbucks’ troubles to the world, to the costly decision to close all Starbucks stores for a day of retraining, to introducing an aggressive pipeline of new innovations to land the next blockbuster offering, ONWARD takes readers through the tough decisions and painful steps of a turnaround that should inspire anyone to reinvent themselves and triumph against the odds.

Well alright then! Sounds like a page-turner. In general I am an admirer of Starbucks marketing, so I think I will make a valiant attempt to read it.

To show what a stand-up guy I am, and as a thanks to Howie for the book, here’s a link to buy it on Amazon.

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